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I drunkenly made out with my work colleague — how do I avoid the Monday morning awkwardness?

Everyone experiences hardships from time to time — whether they be friendship dramas, boyfriend scandals, or job-related challenges. The Morning Breath has generously devoted time every week to guide their viewers as they overcome any predicament — big or small, trivial or consequential.

This week on “Dear Breathers,” a New York millennial writes in to talk about her work woes, as a drunken make-out session has complicated her difficulties with the boys’ club in the office, while another Breather wrestles with issues around moving in with her soon-to-be-fiancé, as his parents are religious and against premarital cohabitation.

First up, a drunken make-out with a work colleague on Friday night can lead to some cringeworthy moments on Monday morning. In this week’s first “Dear Breathers” inquiry, an anonymous viewer reveals that while she loves her job and the group of people — mainly guys — she works with, a drunken make-out has cost her the work relationships she treasured. The once-cordial group of male co-workers have exiled their female colleague without an explanation as to why. In case they haven’t heard, it takes two people to initiate a lip-lock.

Not up to the task of meeting new people in the office or, even worse, eating lunch alone and feeling isolated, the Breather asks Jackie and Claudia how to proceed at work without the hurt feelings. Also, the not-so-gentleman she made out with has a serious girlfriend, so this guy is most likely staying mum about the make-out to protect his relationship from his infidelity.

“There’s nothing worse than having a pit about something you did when you’re drunk,” admits Claudia. The struggles of singles in the workplace transcend, that’s for sure.

Co-host Jackie adds, “I totally understand why you’re freaking out.”

Going forward, the Oshry sisters suggest, “if you feel uncomfortable on your team, you should tell someone.”

Above all else, value your worth, and rest assured that there are people in your office who can handle the maturity you need. “There are other people besides these loser boys,” Claudia encourages. “Focus on yourself, focus on your work, make friends in other departments.”

A final recommendation, option B, is to quit your job and spill the beans to his girlfriend on the way out the door. We repeat, you should only take this route upon resignation from your job if you’re sure that you will never see these people again. Making things more awkward might seem impossible, but it’s definitely not.

Next up, a Breather wants to move in with her soon-to-be-fiancé to save money and make their relationship easier, but his parents are very religious and will not support a wedding that is founded on premarital anything. Should the couple move in together and risk the wrath of his family, or white-lie their way to the wedding and pretend that they live apart?

“I definitely don’t think you should do it behind the parents’ back,” advises Claudia. “That’s a terrible way to start off the marriage.”

Instead, “one of you should get a really sh***y apartment, one of you should get a really nice apartment, and you can just spend all the time in the nice apartment,” recommends Claudia. “And then just get engaged. If you really are there, just do it and then you can live together.”

Jackie adds, “Also, a white lie isn’t a lie about where you live for two years. That’s a big lie.”

Starting the marriage off on a lie is a no-go. “Who wants to be on the outs with their family? Is it really worth it?”

All in all, get two places. You can always move in with each other, but it’s harder to move out.

If you want a chance to have Claudia and Jackie answer your questions live on-air, email DearBreathers@gmail.com.