U.S. Markets closed

Edited Transcript of FIBK earnings conference call or presentation 1-May-20 3:00pm GMT

Q1 2020 First Interstate BancSystem Inc Earnings Call

BILLINGS May 21, 2020 (Thomson StreetEvents) -- Edited Transcript of First Interstate Bancsystem Inc earnings conference call or presentation Friday, May 1, 2020 at 3:00:00pm GMT

TEXT version of Transcript

================================================================================

Corporate Participants

================================================================================

* Kevin P. Riley

First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director

* Lisa Slyter-Bray

First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive Assistant

* Marcy D. Mutch

First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO

================================================================================

Conference Call Participants

================================================================================

* Garrett Anthony Holland

Robert W. Baird & Co. Incorporated, Research Division - Analyst

* Gordon Reilly McGuire

Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst

* Jacquelynne Chimera Bohlen

Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., Research Division - MD, Equity Research

* Jared David Wesley Shaw

Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, Research Division - MD & Senior Analyst

* Jeffrey Allen Rulis

D.A. Davidson & Co., Research Division - Senior VP & Senior Research Analyst

* Matthew Timothy Clark

Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst

================================================================================

Presentation

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [1]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Good day, and welcome to the First Interstate BancSystem First Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call and Webcast. (Operator Instructions) Please note this event is being recorded.

I would now like to turn the conference over to Lisa Slyter-Bray. Please go ahead, ma'am.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lisa Slyter-Bray, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive Assistant [2]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Rocco. Good morning. Thank you for joining us for our first quarter earnings conference call. As we begin, please note that the information provided during this call will contain forward-looking statements. Actual results or outcomes may differ materially from those expressed by those statements. I'd like to direct all listeners to read the cautionary note regarding forward-looking statements and factors that could affect future results contained in our most recent annual report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC and in our earnings release as well as the risk factors identified in the annual report in our more recent periodic reports filed with the SEC. Relevant factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from any forward-looking statements are included in the earnings release and in our SEC filings. The company does not undertake to update any forward-looking statements made today.

A copy of our earnings release, which contains non-GAAP financial measures, is available on our website at fibk.com. Information regarding our use of the non-GAAP financial measures may be found in the body of the earnings release and a reconciliation to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measures is included at the end of the earnings release for your reference.

Joining us from management this morning are Kevin Riley, our Chief Executive Officer; and Marcy Mutch, our Chief Financial Officer. At this time, I'll turn the call over to Kevin Riley. Kevin?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [3]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Lisa. Good morning, and thanks again to all of you for joining us on our call today. Along with our earnings release, we have published an updated investor presentation that has some additional disclosures that we'll be speaking to on our call today. The presentation can be accessed at our Investor Relations website. And if you haven't downloaded a copy yet, I encourage you to do so. I am going to start today by providing a quick overview of our financial results, discussion on our response to the COVID-19 pandemic and provide some additional information around our exposure to the various industries. And then I'll turn the call over to Marcy and she'll provide more details on our financials.

Despite the challenging environment, we delivered another quarter of solid operating performance. While our net income and earnings per share were impacted by building our reserve to reflect a deteriorating economic condition resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, we continue to generate strong pretax, pre-provision income and show positive trends in many key areas. We had a good stability in our core operating net interest margin, which excludes the impact of interest recoveries and loan accretion as we have been able to effectively offset the pressure on earning asset yields by reducing our cost of deposits. Our fee income continues to be a strong source of revenue as we saw a significant increase in mortgage banking revenues due to demand for refinancing. Our wealth management revenue also increased over the prior quarter, despite the volatility in the market that pressured assets under management.

Obviously, the big development during the first quarter was the COVID-19 pandemic. We are fortunate that many of the markets that we operate in have been among the areas of the country least impacted by COVID-19. Montana and Wyoming have been very effective in managing the spread of the virus and rank among the lowest states in the country in terms of infection per capita. Early this week, Montana starts the process of opening up the economy back up, which is very encouraging. Wyoming never had a stay-at-home order in place but did limit large gatherings through the end of April, and now the Governor is looking at options to loosen those restrictions. Likewise, South Dakota never had a stay-at-home order. It has been in the news for an outbreak of the virus at a pork processing facility, but that is in the eastern portion of the state, and we have all of our presence in the western part of the state, which really hasn't been impacted much.

Idaho and Oregon have seen a bit higher impact, but nowhere near some of the harder hit states in the country. The Governor of Idaho has announced a phased approach to reopening their economy that begins today. The one state of our footprint that has been impacted quite a bit is Washington. But we have only a small portion of our employee base and loan portfolio in the western portion of the state that has been hit the hardest.

While on a relative basis, we probably haven't experienced the same impact to other banks around the country, we've certainly seen the negative effects of the pandemic to one degree or another across our markets. And I want to say that I'm very proud of our leadership team and our employees for their incredible effort during this difficult time. As the threat of COVID-19 pandemic accelerated, we quickly made adjustments in our operations to protect the health and safety of our employees and our customers. Approximately 68% of our employees are now working from home. And we have closed all of our bank branch lobbies and reduced operating hours to limit exposure for both employees and clients.

We have made significant investments to enhance our technology infrastructure over the past years and this has enabled us to efficiently transition our employees to a remote work environment without losing productivity and the ability to handle the increased usage of our digital banking platform by our clients. Approximately 72% of our retail clients now utilize our digital platform, which is up 9% from this time last year. To assist our employees, we have put a number of new programs in place. We have continued to pay our employees, who need to be absent due to COVID-19, either to care for themselves or a loved one without having to use their own vacation time. We have updated our medical plans to eliminate the coinsurance payment for COVID-19 testing. And we have expanded our First Relief Employee Assistance Fund, so that our employees experiencing financial challenges due to the COVID-19 can apply for additional support. Our foundation is also double matching contributions to that fund.

In terms of our assistance for our clients, we recognize that there are folks out there who are really suffering, and we wanted to make sure that we provide the support they need to make it through this difficult time by waiving fees and early withdrawal penalties as appropriate. For our borrowers, we are working with our clients to consider deferring loan payments and accepting interest-only payments for a certain period of time, including considering waiving fees for deferrals. For residential mortgage customers, we are offering forbearance plans that allow for reduced mortgage payments or no mortgage payments for a period of 3 to 6 months. To date, we have granted loan deferrals on approximately $1 billion of commercial and CRE loans and $45 million of consumer loans and approved $130 million of forbearance requests on residential mortgage loans.

While we're giving some loan modification to commercial clients, our primary means of support is providing them with access to the SBA Paycheck Protection Program. The investments we have made to adapt our lending to be scalable and the standardized process over the past years served us well in getting up and prepared for the PPP application process. As a result, during the first wave of funding, we were able to get more than 6,800 applications approved for approximately $1 billion in loans. In aggregate, the companies we were helping to access the PPP funding represented more than 107,000 employees in our markets. In total, we received approximately $35 million in fees from the first batch of PPP funding. During the first round, we focused on just helping our existing clients. Over the past couple of weeks, we have expanded our process to include new clients that have opened up deposit accounts with the bank so we can perform our due diligence. These clients will be part of the applications that we processed during the second wave of funding.

In the updated investment presentation that we published, we have provided quite a bit of detail around our loan portfolio and individual segments. And I want to spend a few minutes discussing some of the key takeaways. As a general comment about our loan portfolio, we have not seen a meaningful drawdown on our credit lines since the crisis started, which we believe is a representative of 2 things: the strength of our borrowers, and the lack of need to build up liquidity and the limited disruption they have seen in their businesses.

Looking at our exposure to high-risk industries or loan types, we have $369 million in outstanding loans to the hotel industry, which represents 4.1% of our total loans. It's a strong portfolio with more than 80% of the underlying properties being flagged hotels, and we have an average LTV of under 48%. As of March 31, less than 1% of this portfolio was impaired. We have $483 million in ag loans, which represents 5.4% of our total loans. And at March 31, just 2.3% of this portfolio was impaired.

As we have mentioned in the past, the largest segment of this portfolio is beef, cattle ranching and farming. And within this ag segment, most of the borrowers raised feeder cattle, which are less than a year old, and they get sent to the feedlots in the Midwest, usually in the fall. So while there is some disruption in the beef processing plants, our customers are really at the beginning of the supply chain, and that won't have a really meaningful impact on them unless those plants stay closed for a very long period of time.

Our mall and retail trade exposure is only about 1% of our total loans, with almost none of these loans being in the criticized category as of March 31. As we've mentioned in the past, we have steadily reduced our exposure to the oil and gas industry, and it now represents just 0.5% of our portfolio, and only $4 million of those loans are impaired as of March 31.

And lastly, I want to provide some information around our indirect portfolio, which primarily consists of loans for autos and RVs. It's a high-quality portfolio in which approximately 58% of our originations have FICO scores above 750, and approximately 85% have FICO scores above 700. With our strong underwriting, we have consistently seen a delinquency rate that is well below our peer group in this business. And since the crisis has started, we have increased our collections effort, which has brought down our delinquency rate by 23 basis points during the month of April. And I think our experience in April is a good example of the point I touched on earlier. In our markets, our people are working or going back to work, and they can make their payments. So we feel very comfortable with this portfolio, and it should continue to perform better than the same type of loans in other parts of the country.

And at this point, I'm going to turn the call over to Marcy, so she can provide a little more detail on our financials. Marcy, go ahead.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [4]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Kevin, and good morning, everyone. As I walk through our financial results, unless otherwise noted, all of the prior period comparisons will be with the fourth quarter of 2019.

I'll begin with our income statement. Our net interest income decreased $5.1 million from the prior quarter, partially due to a $1.4 million decrease in accretion income. The remaining decrease was primarily attributable to 1 less day in the quarter and a lower level of earning assets. On a reported basis, our net interest margin decreased 4 basis points to 3.9% in the first quarter. Excluding the impact of interest recoveries and loan accretion, our operating net interest margin was unchanged at 3.77%. Our cost of funds declined 7 basis points from the prior quarter, which helped to offset the pressure on our earning asset yields.

We still have some opportunities to further reduce our cost of funds as our CDs mature and renew at lower rates. We have $766 million in CDs or 68% of the current portfolio that will mature by the end of the year, and these deposits carry a weighted average rate of 1.48%. The CD repricing will help us continue to offset some of the pressure on our net interest margin from the decline in loan yields resulting from the recent Fed rate cuts. For the second quarter, we expect our net interest margin to be flat as we're able to fund a large portion of the PPP loans with our excess liquidity that was parked in overnight funds. Any accelerated fees as a result of loan forgiveness should be accretive to our margin, but this probably will not impact the second quarter.

Moving to noninterest income. We saw an increase of $6.5 million quarter-over-quarter to $43.7 million. The increase was almost entirely due to higher mortgage banking revenue. This increase offset the seasonal decline we normally see in the payment services revenue, which was further impacted by decreases in transaction volume in the last half of March related to COVID-19. All of our other major fee-generating areas were relatively consistent with the prior quarter.

Mortgage banking revenue increased by $5.5 million from the prior quarter due to higher demand for refinancing. Our mix of production for new purchases and refinancing was just about 50-50 this quarter. Our new digital mortgage application portal continues to make a nice contribution as we closed about $7 million of loans or about 6% of our purchase activity through this channel in the quarter. Right now, our online process accepts only purchase originations, but starting in May, it will be opened up to refinancing, which should help generate additional volume through this channel.

We continue to see strong mortgage origination activity heading into May, although we do expect it to taper off as we approach the end of the second quarter and as demand for refinancing begins to drop off. In terms of our other fee income areas, we'll probably not have the seasonal pickup that we typically get in our payment services revenue as we expect consumer spending to remain muted until the economy fully opens up again.

Moving to total noninterest expense. We had no acquisitions. Expenses in this quarter compared with $700,000 acquisition-related expenses last quarter. Excluding acquisition-related expense, our noninterest expense increased $8.3 million from the prior quarter. This was primarily due to the impact of seasonally higher payroll tax expense, higher FDIC insurance following the credit that was recognized last quarter, a $2.9 million impairment to mortgage servicing rights due to higher prepayment fees resulting from the increase in refinancing, and lastly lower quarter-over-quarter gains on the sale of other real estate properties.

While we are always mindful of expenses, with the revenue pressures resulting from the current environment, we are tightening our expense control even more, particularly around discretionary spending, like advertising, reduced travel expenses and reduced training costs. Business travel has stopped for all of our employees, and we are still not allowing outside vendors to come into our facilities. Required meetings, whether for business or training, are still continuing virtually in a very effective manner. For these reasons, we expect our noninterest expense to be lower in the second quarter.

Now moving to the balance sheet. Our total loans were just about flat from the end of the prior quarter. Increases in our commercial real estate and construction loans were offset by small declines in our other portfolios. One thing we did not see this quarter were large drawdowns on unused lines many of the other banks have mentioned as our unused line usage remains steady. In terms of our loan pipeline, we're down a bit from precrisis levels. The macro uncertainty has impacted demand, and many borrowers are opting to focus on applying for PPP loans or utilizing other federal lending programs.

Our total deposits decreased $98 million from the end of the prior quarter. This was due to a decline in noninterest-bearing deposits from commercial customers, along with decreases in time deposits. These decreases were partially offset by increases in interest-bearing demand and savings deposits.

Moving to asset quality. We saw slight increases in most problem asset categories. Our nonperforming assets increased $14.2 million, more than half of which was attributable to the reclassification of purchase credit impaired loans due to our adoption of CECL. Our past due loans increased $15.6 million, but approximately half of that amount came current a week after the quarter end. The slipped into past due status was due to issues with title companies and delays in getting documentation recorded due to COVID-19.

In our presentation, we've included a couple of slides discussing our adoption of CECL, and I'd like to touch on a few of the main pieces of information. While the CARES Act allowed us to consider delaying CECL adoption, at this late date, we determined it was best to stay the course. That said, it's been a pretty interesting time to adopt a new loan loss methodology. Our CECL model was built on an Oracle platform and considers an 11-year look-back period of our historical data. As a result of adopting CECL, we increased our allowance for credit losses on January 1 by $32.3 million or about 44% to consider the lifetime loss in our portfolio loans. This amount includes a $2.3 million, which was attributable to off-balance sheet commitments, as required under CECL, which is included in other liabilities.

In the first quarter, we increased our allowance by an additional $26.1 million to consider the potential impact of COVID-19 on our portfolio. Within the CECL model, we use the Moody's baseline forecast as of March 27, which assumes contraction in our economy during most of the year, with expansion beginning in the fourth quarter along with higher levels of unemployment through 2022. We also considered other economic factors, as noted within our investor deck, to develop our qualitative adjustment to the allowance.

At this time, it's hard to determine the severity of the impact of this medical crisis on our economy. Today, we believe that this increase in our allowance is reflective of the known COVID-19 impact on our portfolio, but the full expense will remain to be seen. There are many variables that make it impossible to project the ultimate impact on the portfolio from the positive benefit of all the stimulus being injected into the economy to the negative impact if there were to be a second outbreak.

Our credit quality is as strong today as it's been throughout the history of our company. As you'll note on our investor deck, the size of our loans are relatively small and spread across the diverse geographic and industry base. We spent the last 4 years improving our credit culture, our operational processes and developing a discipline around resolving problem assets. As such, we believe we are well positioned to handle the next recession.

I'll wrap up by touching on provision expense. We had $3.1 million of net charge-offs during the quarter or 14 basis points of average loans on an annualized basis. Our provision expense was $29 million, which is comprised of a $29.2 million adjustment to the allowance, offset by a decrease in liabilities of $0.2 million for off-balance sheet commitments.

And with that, I'll turn it back over to Kevin. Kevin?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [5]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Marcy. I'm going to wrap up with a few comments about our ability to manage through this crisis. Although no one knew that 2020, we would see an emergence of a global pandemic. It demonstrates the value of our conservative approach that we've always used to manage the bank. I've spoken a number of times over the past few years about how we refuse to compromise our underwriting criteria in order to generate loan growth. Even though the economy has been relatively healthy over the last several years, we just don't believe in ever straying from our disciplined approach.

Our goal is to maintain a fortress balance sheet with strong asset quality based on conservative underwriting criteria, a high level of reserves, excess capital and ample liquidity. By doing so, we are always prepared to manage through any downturn in the economy and protect the interest of all our stakeholders, our clients, our employees and our shareholders. Accordingly, we believe we are well positioned to weather this current storm and continue to enhance the value of our franchise over the long term.

I've been in banking for a long time, and this situation is way different than any of us have ever seen before. We can't anticipate how long the slowdown might last or at what speed folks might get back to work. The good news for our industry is that under -- unlike the financial crisis caused by the Great Recession, we have a great opportunity to be part of the solution. Advances in technology are letting our clients interact with our bankers in an efficient and safe manner and allowing us to be highly productive and continue providing exceptional service under extraordinary circumstances.

As we've indicated, we have plenty of capital and liquidity to manage through this crisis. From a capital management standpoint, our priorities will be maintaining sufficient capital to provide credit for our clients and support economic activities in our market as well as maintaining our quarterly cash dividend. The dividend is relatively a small claim on our capital, and we should be well supported by continued operating earnings. For the time being, we are suspending activity on our stock repurchase program. And we'll be reevaluating this decision as conditions warrant in the coming quarters.

I'll wrap up by saying I'm extremely proud of the First Interstate team. They have demonstrated concerns for each other and taking care of their teammates. They have gone the extra mile to ensure we meet the needs of our clients and our communities. And you heard me say before, I have the best banking job in America. I also think I have the best team in America. They've proven to be reliable, resilient and responsive through this very tough period of time.

So with that, I'll open the call for questions.

================================================================================

Questions and Answers

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [1]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(Operator Instructions) Today's first question comes from Jared Shaw at Wells Fargo Securities.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jared David Wesley Shaw, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, Research Division - MD & Senior Analyst [2]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First, I guess, thanks for the detail. This is a great slide deck, really helps us as we're looking at stuff. So I appreciate the time and effort you put into that. I guess just starting on asset quality, when you look at the qualitative factor input, I'm assuming one that, that increased the provision over the baseline. And can you just sort of give us a sense of how much that increased over what the baseline would have been otherwise on the Q1 provision?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [3]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So most of the increase on -- in for the day 2, for the first quarter, that was a result of the qualitative factors.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jared David Wesley Shaw, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, Research Division - MD & Senior Analyst [4]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. But so your qualitative factors became more severe than the Moody's baseline. Is that correct?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [5]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That's correct.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jared David Wesley Shaw, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, Research Division - MD & Senior Analyst [6]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And then if we look at -- I hear you saying that Montana is ready to reopen, if we get to the summer and the tourism attendance isn't as strong as expected. How sensitive are your customers, I guess, to any potential slowdown in tourism? So as we look through the summer, when should we be looking for sort of warning signs with that?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [7]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes. Jared, I would say the warning signs are probably going to show up going into the third quarter if we see anything. But as you know, Montana, one of our biggest industry is the tourist industry. So we're hoping that we'll get back to that. It's interesting that during this whole pandemic, there's a lot of people from New York and around the country that are hiding out in Montana to stay safe. So I think it's safe here and people might come here because it is one of the safer places in the United States.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jared David Wesley Shaw, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, Research Division - MD & Senior Analyst [8]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And then on the ag exposure, on the protein side, do any of those customers hedge that out? So as we move through the year, if we still see some type of a logjam in the chain there. Do they hedge at all? Or is that not really an industry can hedge?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [9]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I don't think many people hedge that -- their [cattle] stuff. I think they just ride with it. So yes, it could have an impact if prices stay down, but...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [10]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We could ask that question. Yes, off the top of my head, I don't -- I'm not sure. I haven't heard of that.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [11]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

One of the largest cattle producers is the Scott family. And I don't think they hedge theirs. So they put out about 11,000 to 12,000 head of cows a year. So I don't think they hedged their portfolio, so, but a good question. We'll get back to you, and look into that.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jared David Wesley Shaw, Wells Fargo Securities, LLC, Research Division - MD & Senior Analyst [12]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And then can you just give us an update on M&A? I know obviously that's not a priority at this point, given everything. But is this something that is off the table for months or quarters or years? I guess what would have to happen for everybody to get any comfort to seeing a deal happen in the future?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [13]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I think things will have to settle down, Jared, to have something come about. I mean a lot of the bankers that we're maybe thinking about partnering or something, they've been really busy with trying to help their clients during this period of time. So talks have really stalled, but I think talks could continue if things stabilize. When that time comes about, I don't know. But I think that -- I think crisis always kind of separate the wheat from the chaff. So people who did really well, are going to do well. And I think people who had a hard time are going to think harder about continuing to be independent.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [14]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Our next question today comes from Jeff Rulis with D.A. Davidson.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jeffrey Allen Rulis, D.A. Davidson & Co., Research Division - Senior VP & Senior Research Analyst [15]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wanted to kind of a follow-on on just the return to open businesses. More on the -- less on tourism, but just kind of the businesses that you work with, trying to get a sense for, if you've had conversations about their thoughts on return of some normalcy of business. And do you think it's sort of kind of phased-in or sort of foot traffic is minimized, but kind of give us a sense for the conversations you've had about just the local businesses, and how they foresee that return?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [16]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes. I would tell you, if it was up to Montanans, they would act like this thing is over, and same with Wyoming. I think the thing is that they're trying to hold back on some of the stuff. I mean part of it is people are supposed to wear mask and stuff, but I would tell you the compliance to that is about 0. And so I think it's just going to be slow at first, and then it's going to pick up in some of the states that we're in. Time will tell. It's harder to predict what's going to happen. But if you really look at what's going on in Billings, which is the largest city in Montana, it's getting pretty close back to normal. I mean I'm surprised the amount of people that are in the various establishments and stuff.

So I would say if it continues the way it's going, then it's going to get back faster than I would expect. I mean Yellowstone County, which is where Billings is, we -- the last 3 days, we've had 0 cases -- new cases in the county. And most of Montana, the counties never any had a case. So it's really -- the biggest area of Montana was Gallatin Valley, and that's the Bozeman, Big Sky area, and due to the fact that people probably brought it from out of town when they were trying to hide out in Montana. But besides that, I think a lot of the areas are going to turn back to normal. I think even Idaho, the biggest area impacted in Idaho was Sun Valley. Again, people going to their second homes or something and bringing the virus, but I think people are waiting to get back. And if you look out, it's getting back to pretty close to normal.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jeffrey Allen Rulis, D.A. Davidson & Co., Research Division - Senior VP & Senior Research Analyst [17]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Got it. Okay. And I think, Marcy, you mentioned on the -- overall on the NPA build, half of that was a reclass of PCI, but that leaves about another, I guess, $7 million or so. Any sense of what industry was that in? And do you think any of that was driven by kind of COVID pressure or tipped over from that? Or was that a preexisting issue?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [18]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I don't recall the industry, but I can tell you that it was a preexisting condition, and it was not COVID related.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [19]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes. We have seen no COVID related pressure on our portfolio as of today -- as of date.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jeffrey Allen Rulis, D.A. Davidson & Co., Research Division - Senior VP & Senior Research Analyst [20]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. On a credit perspective that you mean there?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [21]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Right. Yes.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jeffrey Allen Rulis, D.A. Davidson & Co., Research Division - Senior VP & Senior Research Analyst [22]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Got it. Okay. Okay. And then maybe one last one, Marcy, to pull out the crystal ball here, your comment on the margin in the second quarter, I appreciate that. I guess thoughts or positioning for the second half, if you could frame up sort of how you think you manage the puts and takes? Obviously, PPP will be a bit of an impact. But kind of the core margin and expectations kind of leverage you can pull in the second half. Just framing that up would be helpful.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [23]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So I would say in terms of lowering deposit costs further, except for the CD runoff that we'll see that we've kind of -- our powder is dry there. So -- I mean, our powder is all spent there. And so the biggest benefit we're going to see is from the PPP loans and the acceleration of some of those deferred fees. And I think that the acceleration of the deferred fees will drive our margin higher as we head into the second part of the year.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [24]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes. So I'll give you my purview. I think the margin, like Marcy said, it's going to be flat to -- if we have some -- some of those loans pay off earlier, it could be up in the second quarter, but pretty much flat. But in the third quarter, all bets are off, it probably could go north really fast because of all those fees being recognized. I think we would return to maybe a normal run rate in the fourth quarter. And what we're hoping for is new growth from the addition of a lot of corporate customers.

We are very fortunate in the PPP process that we brought a lot of new customers into the bank, and we're in the hope that they move the relationship over to us. They were very dissatisfied by many of the institutions. And the first go-around, we were able to pretty much take care of all of our customers, so that the second round, we pretty much just opened it up to take care of other banks customers. And I'll just give you an example. We normally open about 500 corporate relationships a month. We opened -- we had 2,000 come in, in the month of March, well above our normal thing. So we believe that what we have done with regard to taking care of the people in our communities that hopefully that will translate into a lot of additional customers.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [25]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And our next question today comes from Jackie Bohlen of KBW.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacquelynne Chimera Bohlen, Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., Research Division - MD, Equity Research [26]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just to continue on that line of questioning. So you said that was 2,000 new customers in March. Do you have a sense if that velocity continued into April?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [27]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We don't have the numbers in April, but I would say -- I would actually say it probably picked up because that's when we really started taking care of some. And it's going to pick up even more due to the fact that we did some, we just opened little accounts and then did their loans. And they -- I mean, I've never received so many letters from customers and the communities talking about how we helped them through this difficult time. It's been very humbling to the fact that our employees have done such a wonderful job. So I do think it's going to translate into more additional customers.

I mean the letters all said that I got, and I just get a lot of them, which normally, I only get letters of complaints, and there are none of those coming through on this program. But I would tell you that it's going to take time for the -- move the whole relationship over it. But I mean, just the likes of Wells fell down and U.S. fell down and Banner fell down and just -- Umpqua and stuff like that. I mean we had sometimes where we -- they came and applied for loans, and we were helping because they couldn't get it through their own bank. And then we called the customer up and said, "Well, we put it through, but it's already been approved at Banner." And they're like, "Well, we're getting more information from you guys than our own bank about our loan process." So it was interesting, and that happened in a number of different institutions. So I mean just don't pick out that one. But I -- our employees just did an unbelievable job.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacquelynne Chimera Bohlen, Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., Research Division - MD, Equity Research [28]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Great. No. I mean so my expectation from this is that as we return to the new normal, relative to growth you would otherwise expect, you could see a little bit of a lift in both -- certainly in deposits and as loans in the longer term from these new relationships, is that fair?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [29]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That's fair to say. That's why I'm hoping that the fourth quarter, we have those new relationships. And as things start rolling off that are abnormal that we'll be supported with more core banking relationships.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacquelynne Chimera Bohlen, Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., Research Division - MD, Equity Research [30]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. Okay. And I want to make sure that I understood the comments on your timing expectations. So at this point, you're not expecting to see much of those accelerated fees in 2Q, you're expecting that to really hit in 3Q. Did I write that down correctly?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [31]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That's correct.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [32]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That's correct.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacquelynne Chimera Bohlen, Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., Research Division - MD, Equity Research [33]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And the deferred fees, you're referring specifically to PPP. There's not some other accelerated payoff or other portfolio that you were referencing, right?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [34]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That's correct.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacquelynne Chimera Bohlen, Keefe, Bruyette, & Woods, Inc., Research Division - MD, Equity Research [35]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. Okay. And then just one last one for me and then I'll step back. In terms of more of a housekeeping item, really, the MSR impairment, was that part of the usual evaluation of MSR just given the environment and the rates? Or was that something very unique and specific to the first quarter?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [36]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No, that's just -- it's just every quarter we look at it.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [37]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Every month, actually, we look at that.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [38]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

But the thing is that, just the speed of prepayments, you have to then value your MSRs. And as that speed of prepayment comes down, we might actually reverse some of that, it might come back to us in the future.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [39]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Our next question comes from Gordon McGuire at Stephens.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [40]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy, I was hoping you could reconcile something for me. So your NIM guidance was for flat next quarter even where you're not expecting those accelerated fees from PPP to come in? Is that correct?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [41]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Right. That's correct.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [42]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. So the replacement of overnight funds into 1% PPP, that's going to be enough of a lift to offset any kind of loan repricing. I guess could you just run through the loan portfolio repricing?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [43]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So you have the 1% that you're earning on this plus you're amortizing those deferred fees through the term, and so then they accelerate when they get forgiven or paid down. So between the amortization from the fees, which goes into interest income and the 1% earnings because we're funding that with overnight funds that were at 10 basis points.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [44]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So quickly, a quick story. These loans, the PPP loans with the fee will actually yield about 3%. Because under FAS 91, you capitalize those fees and amortize them over the life of the loan. And then when they pay off, you get -- the remainder comes into income.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [45]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Immediately.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [46]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay, okay. All right. And Marcy, could you walk through the -- just loan repricing dynamics? What kind of floor protection do you have at this point?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [47]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

You bet. And so 51% of our loans remain floating. And of those, that 51%, which is about $4.6 billion, a $1 billion of those have floors. And of those that have floors, 81% have hit their floors. So we only have about $186 million that have not hit their floors.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [48]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. Great. And then margin -- sorry, the mortgage fees up pretty significantly, but the volumes were down. And I guess that implies a gain on sales spread that's much higher than I would have thought there would have been. Was there anything noisy in that, that contributed to that number?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [49]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No. Volumes were actually up.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [50]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Volumes were up.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [51]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I guess I'm looking at the slide deck, and it looks like volumes were down. Okay. How much were volumes up quarter-on-quarter?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [52]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quarter-over-quarter, they may not have been up quarter-over-quarter, where I was look -- thinking of first quarter last year. So yes, we did have some increase in our gain on sale margin. I don't know that...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [53]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And the reason for that is because the volumes were coming and so we had to start upping the price to slow down the volume.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [54]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [55]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So that's why we got a better margin.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [56]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. So nothing like an MSR benefit or anything like that?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [57]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [58]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And how are margins trending so far into April -- or, I guess, May now?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [59]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just flat, trending into May.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [60]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay, flat compared to the first quarter?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [61]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gordon Reilly McGuire, Stephens Inc., Research Division - Research Analyst [62]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And then just last thing. Could you -- within the payments, can you quantify what type of drop off you saw in March relative to January and February?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [63]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It was just in the last 2 weeks in payment services revenues. And it fell off -- it fell off pretty substantially. I'll get back to you on that, Gordon.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [64]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We'll get back to you on that one. We don't have that answer.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [65]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Our next question comes from the Matthew Clark of Piper Sandler.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew Timothy Clark, Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst [66]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First one for me, just on the deferral activity, the $1 billion of commercial deferrals. I guess what percentage of those are going to get PPP or have received PPP?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [67]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

14%. 14% of the deferrals and there's overlap of 14%.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [68]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes. 14%.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew Timothy Clark, Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst [69]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. Great. And then with the round 2 and the wave of new customers coming to you, are you requiring them to have a deposit account initially? Or is that something you just expect to get over time?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [70]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No. They had to open initial deposit account, but it takes time for people to move corporate operating accounts over, so.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew Timothy Clark, Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst [71]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And then can you quantify the purchase discount at the end of the first quarter so we can gross up the reserve for the mark?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [72]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I don't understand the question. What was the question?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew Timothy Clark, Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst [73]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The purchase accounting discount on your books that your loan book -- the reserve.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [74]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So that kind of goes away with CECL. I mean we're still amortizing that, yes, into income, but it isn't a factor anymore. We evaluate the whole loan portfolio under CECL without any consideration for -- I mean, there's just not that same factor.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew Timothy Clark, Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst [75]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Got it. Okay. And then on the -- just thinking about loan production and kind of the opportunities that exist out there. I know you guys have tightened standards over the years in certain segments. Have you made any additional tightening since the pandemic emerged? Or -- and do you see opportunities for good business out there? Just trying to get a sense for whether or not you're tightening the reins further or not.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [76]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No, we're not tightening the reins any further. We're going to stay with our same criteria. But I will tell you, right now, there's not a lot of people out borrowing a lot of money for expansion. Everybody is pretty much in the same camp seeing where this is all going to go. So people are still doing business. But I don't -- there's not a lot of people out borrowing much of money to expand their businesses at this juncture.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew Timothy Clark, Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst [77]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes. Understood. And then just a couple of minor items. The wealth management revenues, are those based on prior -- in terms of the fees, are they're tied to last quarter end in terms of the mark, is that right?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [78]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes. We could see a little bit of pressure in our wealth management revenues.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [79]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew Timothy Clark, Piper Sandler & Co., Research Division - MD & Senior Research Analyst [80]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Okay. And then just the tax rate going forward, given the lower level of income?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [81]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yes, probably right around 22%.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [82]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Our next question comes from Garrett Holland with Baird.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Garrett Anthony Holland, Robert W. Baird & Co. Incorporated, Research Division - Analyst [83]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Just wanted to start on asset quality. I mean the recession appears less severe in your markets, which is great. But 12% of borrowers are still in forbearance. And there's probably some impact from the quarantine. But are they asking for relief out of conservatism? Or how do you expect that figure to trend from its fairly elevated level?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [84]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I think everybody -- most people came in just to ask forbearance not because they're in financial trouble. I just -- it was a rush to the door to get something like that, just to ease what there might be ahead. And so I don't think a lot of those forbearance is due to the fact that people are -- that was really a visible issue right now. They think they had the opportunity, so they took it. I think same thing with the PPP loans. A lot of people took the opportunity to get loans quickly. So I don't see anything right now that's kind of the tip of the iceberg, but time will tell.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Garrett Anthony Holland, Robert W. Baird & Co. Incorporated, Research Division - Analyst [85]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That is helpful. And then maybe shifting to net interest income. Clearly, a very encouraging trend with the newer client acquisition and understand the muted underlying demand and puts and takes on the margin line. But overall, do you feel you're going to be able to grind out spread income growth from here?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [86]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We've been pretty consistent, but it's one of those things that we talk to our lenders about all the time, trying to kind of maintain, consider the environment we're in, consider the credit you're doing. Again, because we have some smaller borrowers, we're able to kind of do a little bit better.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [87]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We're trying to keep -- credit spreads are widening as you even look at corporate debt out there. So we're trying to educate our lenders that credit spreads -- even though rate environment is low, the credit spread should be high. And especially during this period of time of pandemic, the credit spread should be really high. So we're -- I would tell you that at first, some of the customers came in and then we were talking about refinancing to a lower rate, and we stopped that real quick because of the education of credit spreads. So I think we're going to hold a line on that. And if we do any more lending, we're going to try to keep credit spreads high. Until such time, we understand what this environment is going to pan out to be.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Garrett Anthony Holland, Robert W. Baird & Co. Incorporated, Research Division - Analyst [88]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

That's fair. And just one last one on expenses. Obviously, costs are seasonally higher in the first quarter and you're flexing on savings. But how do you expect the expense run rate from a quarterly perspective to progress through the year?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [89]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

So it should come down a little bit. I think initially, we gave guidance between $97 million and $98 million run rate a quarter. We expect that we will be able to bring that down a little bit as we head into this quarter and the remainder of the year, until at least things get back to normal.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [90]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I mean I think we get that mark if you -- because -- you know the thing is if you back out the MSR adjustment, we're pretty much right on the mark that we say we're going to be.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marcy D. Mutch, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - Executive VP & CFO [91]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And normally, that's a higher quarter.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [92]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

And that's a higher quarter. So we believe that we should do better from that standpoint going forward.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [93]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ladies and gentlemen, this concludes the question-and-answer session. I'd like to turn it back over to the management team for any final remarks.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kevin P. Riley, First Interstate BancSystem, Inc. - President, CEO & Director [94]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Again, thank you for your questions. As always, we welcome calls from our investors and analysts. Please reach out to us if you have any follow-up questions. Thank you for turning in -- tuning in today. And be safe and healthy, and I look forward to talking to you in the future. Thank you.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operator [95]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thank you, sir. This concludes today's conference call. We thank you all for attending today's presentation. You may now disconnect your lines, and have a wonderful day.