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Energy sector to bear brunt of stepped up German climate law - draft

·1 min read

BERLIN, May 6 (Reuters) - The German government expects the energy sector to play the biggest role in reducing carbon emissions by 2030, according to a draft of the reform to its climate protection law seen by Reuters on Thursday.

The draft law, which is due to be passed by the cabinet next Wednesday, requires the energy sector to cut C02 emissions by around a third more than previously planned.

Industry must reduce its emissions by a further 15% and the transport sector by another 10%, according to the draft.

All targets for the individual sectors are considered provisional as the European Union must still make decisions which will likely influence the targets.

The new climate law stipulates that Germany must now cut greenhouse gases by 65% by 2030 compared to 1990 levels. Its previous target was for a reduction of at least 55%.

The changes follow an order by Germany's constitutional court last week to tighten the legislation to set out how the government would bring carbon emissions down to almost zero by 2050. (Reporting by Markus Wacket Writing by Caroline Copley Editing by Thomas Escritt)