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Falcon Minerals (NASDAQ:FLMN) Has A Pretty Healthy Balance Sheet

Simply Wall St

Legendary fund manager Li Lu (who Charlie Munger backed) once said, 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital. It's only natural to consider a company's balance sheet when you examine how risky it is, since debt is often involved when a business collapses. We note that Falcon Minerals Corporation (NASDAQ:FLMN) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

When Is Debt A Problem?

Generally speaking, debt only becomes a real problem when a company can't easily pay it off, either by raising capital or with its own cash flow. Ultimately, if the company can't fulfill its legal obligations to repay debt, shareholders could walk away with nothing. While that is not too common, we often do see indebted companies permanently diluting shareholders because lenders force them to raise capital at a distressed price. Of course, debt can be an important tool in businesses, particularly capital heavy businesses. The first thing to do when considering how much debt a business uses is to look at its cash and debt together.

Check out our latest analysis for Falcon Minerals

How Much Debt Does Falcon Minerals Carry?

As you can see below, Falcon Minerals had US$38.0m of debt, at September 2019, which is about the same the year before. You can click the chart for greater detail. However, because it has a cash reserve of US$2.63m, its net debt is less, at about US$35.4m.

NasdaqCM:FLMN Historical Debt, November 14th 2019

How Healthy Is Falcon Minerals's Balance Sheet?

Zooming in on the latest balance sheet data, we can see that Falcon Minerals had liabilities of US$1.97m due within 12 months and liabilities of US$38.5m due beyond that. Offsetting this, it had US$2.63m in cash and US$8.03m in receivables that were due within 12 months. So it has liabilities totalling US$29.8m more than its cash and near-term receivables, combined.

Since publicly traded Falcon Minerals shares are worth a total of US$569.9m, it seems unlikely that this level of liabilities would be a major threat. But there are sufficient liabilities that we would certainly recommend shareholders continue to monitor the balance sheet, going forward.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

Falcon Minerals's net debt is only 0.56 times its EBITDA. And its EBIT easily covers its interest expense, being 19.3 times the size. So you could argue it is no more threatened by its debt than an elephant is by a mouse. On the other hand, Falcon Minerals's EBIT dived 14%, over the last year. If that rate of decline in earnings continues, the company could find itself in a tight spot. There's no doubt that we learn most about debt from the balance sheet. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine Falcon Minerals's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

Finally, a company can only pay off debt with cold hard cash, not accounting profits. So we clearly need to look at whether that EBIT is leading to corresponding free cash flow. Happily for any shareholders, Falcon Minerals actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT over the last three years. There's nothing better than incoming cash when it comes to staying in your lenders' good graces.

Our View

Happily, Falcon Minerals's impressive interest cover implies it has the upper hand on its debt. But we must concede we find its EBIT growth rate has the opposite effect. When we consider the range of factors above, it looks like Falcon Minerals is pretty sensible with its use of debt. That means they are taking on a bit more risk, in the hope of boosting shareholder returns. We'd be motivated to research the stock further if we found out that Falcon Minerals insiders have bought shares recently. If you would too, then you're in luck, since today we're sharing our list of reported insider transactions for free.

If, after all that, you're more interested in a fast growing company with a rock-solid balance sheet, then check out our list of net cash growth stocks without delay.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.