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France Wants to Fine Facebook For Hate Speech

Say Contributor
While Americans were busy grilling hot dogs, French lawmakers approved a measure to force tech companies like Google and Facebook to remove hate speech from their platforms or face huge fines. So How Would This Work? The measure, which is part of a larger internet regulatory bill, passed the lower part of the French Parliament yesterday. If it becomes law, social networks would have 24 hour deadlines to remove hateful content from their platforms once it has been flagged. France Isn’t The First: Facebook has been notoriously slow (and critics would argue, ham-fisted) in its efforts to remove inflammatory content from its site. But several of the world’s governments are not here for Facebook dragging its heels, as last year Germany, which has some of the strictest anti-hate speech laws on Earth, became the latest country to lean on Mark Zuckerberg. It passed a law that would levy fines of up to €50 million for failing to remove illegal content within 24 hours. Bummer Summer: France isn’t the only one that’s been breathing down Facebook’s neck of late over content policies. Investors are also in the mix. New York state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli wrote a letter to Zuckerberg calling for Facebook to replace him as board chair, and that Facebook’s mishandling of personal data and slow response to false news and hate speech is exposing shareholders to increased risk. DiNapoli's interested are vested. He oversees the New York State Common Retirement Fund, which has over $1 billion in Facebook shares. -Michael Tedder Photo: ADOBE / BRAD PICT

While Americans were busy grilling hot dogs, French lawmakers approved a measure to force tech companies like Google and Facebook to remove hate speech from their platforms or face huge fines. So How Would This Work? The measure, which is part of a larger internet regulatory bill, passed the lower part of the French Parliament yesterday. If it becomes law, social networks would have 24 hour deadlines to remove hateful content from their platforms once it has been flagged. France Isn’t The First: Facebook has been notoriously slow (and critics would argue, ham-fisted) in its efforts to remove inflammatory content from its site. But several of the world’s governments are not here for Facebook dragging its heels, as last year Germany, which has some of the strictest anti-hate speech laws on Earth, became the latest country to lean on Mark Zuckerberg. It passed a law that would levy fines of up to €50 million for failing to remove illegal content within 24 hours. Bummer Summer: France isn’t the only one that’s been breathing down Facebook’s neck of late over content policies. Investors are also in the mix. New York state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli wrote a letter to Zuckerberg calling for Facebook to replace him as board chair, and that Facebook’s mishandling of personal data and slow response to false news and hate speech is exposing shareholders to increased risk. DiNapoli's interested are vested. He oversees the New York State Common Retirement Fund, which has over $1 billion in Facebook shares. -Michael Tedder Photo: ADOBE / BRAD PICT