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George Noble Blasts Jim Cramer "That is all bullsh*t" - Why He's Avoiding Energy Stocks

·3 min read

George Noble, Managing Partner and Chief Investment Officer of Noble Capital Advisors, is a must-follow on Twitter. Aside from sharing his views and opinions, the star stock-picker is unafraid when it comes to controversy and confrontation.

A recent example is a tweet he shared on June 21 2022, where he laid into investment celebrity Jim Cramer. In his tweet, Noble cites the Belkin Report and shares an excerpt referencing the bullish consensus on energy stocks stating, "In our humble opinion, that is all bullshit". The report calls out a few by name, including Fed Chairmen Jerome Powell, President Joe Biden, and the financial press as a whole. His model is adding short positions on crude oil, and energy products.

Noble backs his claims and provides reassurance by providing evidence of Cramer saying the opposite. Noble’s position is typically that you should follow the opposite of everything Cramer says. His contrarian viewpoint isn’t just pointed at the CNBC star, however. It’s pointed at everything and everyone.

Atop his Twitter profile, you’ll find a link to an interview he did with Forbes. The article’s title includes a line calling our current state of affairs, “The Everything Bubble”. Within the document, he shares his advice on what to buy. His answer? Hold cash. His general outlook paints a dark picture, albeit a picture with fascinating detail and craftsmanship.

If you’re interested in his war on investing in crypto, infantilization-as-a-service brands, and NFTs, you may want to follow him on Twitter.

If you believe that we truly are in the midst of an “everything bubble”, it may be wise to invest in resources that have withstood previous bear markets, and still hold value today. Consider investing in assets that have been valued and shared since humans were able to do so: Art and Wine.

Real Estate: Viewed by many as one of the most stable investments, regardless of the economic climate, real estate makes a great addition to an investment portfolio. Land is finite, and rising interest rates mean it may be harder for individuals to acquire their own piece of property. Most real estate investments also provide income, which can be especially helpful in a down economy.

Consider crowdfunding opportunities and REITs. REITs can be sector-focused, and each carries its own earnings potential. Consider health care REITs as an option, as Physicians Realty Trust (NYSE: DOC) has remained fairly resistant during the current bear market and has an attractive dividend yield of 5.4%.

Another option includes fractional real estate ownership. For example, one investment platform allows non-accredited investors to buy shares of individual rental properties with an investment anywhere from $100 to $10,000. There are also options to invest in entire portfolios of institutional-quality properties with as little as $10.

Accredited investors can gain access to private offerings for large-scale developments, which often have target annualized returns above 20%.

See also: Rent Growth And Property Values Outpace Inflation, Creating A Unique Opportunity For Investors With Multifamily Developments

Fine Wine: Wine has a history of being a steady resistor to inflation and recessions. The Liv-ex Fine Wine 1000 index is currently up 10.3% year-to-date, performing much better than the overall stock market.

The most common way to invest in wine is through an Alcohol or Beverage Exchange Traded Fund (ETF). These ETFs can be a great way to gain exposure to the wine industry without needing to bet on any specific bottle or specific company. So, if you’re not passionate about wine or not willing to risk your finances on your expertise, you can check out wine-related funds like B.A.D. ETF (ARCA: BAD) which specializes in Betting, Alcohol and Gambling.

You can also consider a more direct approach, like buying securitized shares of a valuable wine collection through an alternative investment platform.

Photo by a katz on Shutterstock

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