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Google, Facebook Remain Divided Over Self-Regulatory Body Proposal For India's Social Media Sector

·1 min read
  • Alphabet Inc's (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL) Google objected to developing a self-regulatory body for the social media sector in India to hear user complaints, Reuters reports.

  • However, Meta Platforms Inc's (NASDAQ: META) Facebook and Twitter Inc (NYSE: TWTR) backed the proposal.

  • India in June proposed appointing a government panel to listen to complaints from users about content moderation decisions. India is also open to a self-regulatory body.

  • However, the lack of consensus among the tech giants increases the likelihood of a government panel, something that Facebook and Twitter detest.

  • After a meeting involving the government and the companies, Google expressed disinterest in the self-regulatory body as it implied external reviews of decisions that could force Google to reinstate content, even if it violated Google's internal policies.

  • Snap Inc (NYSE: SNAP) and ShareChat also voiced concern about a self-regulatory system.

  • Twitter has faced flak after it blocked accounts of influential Indians, including politicians, citing violations of its policies.

  • Twitter also locked horns with the Indian government when it declined to comply fully with orders regarding spreading misinformation.

  • Western tech giants have been at odds with the Indian government for years, arguing that strict regulations hurt their business and investment plans.

  • Image by succo from Pixabay

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