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H&R Block settles trademark lawsuit against Block over name change

By Blake Brittain

(Reuters) -Tax-preparation giant H&R Block Inc and Block Inc , the company formerly known as Square, have jointly agreed to dismiss H&R Block's lawsuit over Block's name change, according to a Friday filing in Missouri federal court.

The companies asked the court to dismiss the case with prejudice, which means it cannot be refiled. H&R Block said in a statement Monday that the companies had "amicably resolved" their dispute.

Representatives for Block did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Monday.

San Francisco-based Block's chief executive, Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, announced the mobile payment company would change its name from Square in 2021. H&R Block sued in its hometown of Kansas City later that year, accusing Block of trying to profit from its reputation and asking the court to force it to change its name.

A federal judge granted H&R Block's request last year to temporarily stop Block from using its new name and green-square logo to market its tax-preparation service Cash App Taxes. A U.S. appeals court overturned the decision in January after finding insufficient evidence of potential consumer confusion to justify the order.

(Reporting by Blake Brittain in Washington)

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