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Imagine Owning China Machinery Engineering (HKG:1829) And Wondering If The 35% Share Price Slide Is Justified

Simply Wall St

Many investors define successful investing as beating the market average over the long term. But the risk of stock picking is that you will likely buy under-performing companies. We regret to report that long term China Machinery Engineering Corporation (HKG:1829) shareholders have had that experience, with the share price dropping 35% in three years, versus a market return of about 23%. Furthermore, it's down 12% in about a quarter. That's not much fun for holders. Of course, this share price action may well have been influenced by the 9.0% decline in the broader market, throughout the period.

See our latest analysis for China Machinery Engineering

To quote Buffett, 'Ships will sail around the world but the Flat Earth Society will flourish. There will continue to be wide discrepancies between price and value in the marketplace...' By comparing earnings per share (EPS) and share price changes over time, we can get a feel for how investor attitudes to a company have morphed over time.

During the three years that the share price fell, China Machinery Engineering's earnings per share (EPS) dropped by 1.1% each year. This reduction in EPS is slower than the 14% annual reduction in the share price. So it seems the market was too confident about the business, in the past. This increased caution is also evident in the rather low P/E ratio, which is sitting at 5.51.

The image below shows how EPS has tracked over time (if you click on the image you can see greater detail).

SEHK:1829 Past and Future Earnings, August 5th 2019

It's probably worth noting that the CEO is paid less than the median at similar sized companies. It's always worth keeping an eye on CEO pay, but a more important question is whether the company will grow earnings throughout the years. Before buying or selling a stock, we always recommend a close examination of historic growth trends, available here..

What About Dividends?

It is important to consider the total shareholder return, as well as the share price return, for any given stock. The TSR is a return calculation that accounts for the value of cash dividends (assuming that any dividend received was reinvested) and the calculated value of any discounted capital raisings and spin-offs. It's fair to say that the TSR gives a more complete picture for stocks that pay a dividend. As it happens, China Machinery Engineering's TSR for the last 3 years was -24%, which exceeds the share price return mentioned earlier. And there's no prize for guessing that the dividend payments largely explain the divergence!

A Different Perspective

We regret to report that China Machinery Engineering shareholders are down 13% for the year (even including dividends). Unfortunately, that's worse than the broader market decline of 5.1%. Having said that, it's inevitable that some stocks will be oversold in a falling market. The key is to keep your eyes on the fundamental developments. Regrettably, last year's performance caps off a bad run, with the shareholders facing a total loss of 2.3% per year over five years. We realise that Buffett has said investors should 'buy when there is blood on the streets', but we caution that investors should first be sure they are buying a high quality businesses. Before forming an opinion on China Machinery Engineering you might want to consider the cold hard cash it pays as a dividend. This free chart tracks its dividend over time.

If you are like me, then you will not want to miss this free list of growing companies that insiders are buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on HK exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.