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Have Insiders Been Selling Hingham Institution for Savings (NASDAQ:HIFS) Shares This Year?

Mercedes Harden

We’ve lost count of how many times insiders have accumulated shares in a company that goes on to improve markedly. Unfortunately, there are also plenty of examples of share prices declining precipitously after insiders have sold shares. So we’ll take a look at whether insiders have been buying or selling shares in Hingham Institution for Savings (NASDAQ:HIFS).

Do Insider Transactions Matter?

Most investors know that it is quite permissible for company leaders, such as directors of the board, to buy and sell stock on the market. However, most countries require that the company discloses such transactions to the market.

We don’t think shareholders should simply follow insider transactions. But logic dictates you should pay some attention to whether insiders are buying or selling shares. As Peter Lynch said, ‘insiders might sell their shares for any number of reasons, but they buy them for only one: they think the price will rise.’

View our latest analysis for Hingham Institution for Savings

The Last 12 Months Of Insider Transactions At Hingham Institution for Savings

Scott Moser made the biggest insider sale in the last 12 months. That single transaction was for US$580k worth of shares at a price of US$232 each. So what is clear is that an insider saw fit to sell at around the current price of US$198. They might be selling for a variety of reasons, but it’s hard to argue this is a bullish sign. We usually pause to reflect on the potential that a stock has a high valuation, if insiders have been selling at around the current price.

Happily, we note that in the last year insiders paid US$358k for 1.73k shares. On the other hand they divested 8.71k shares, for US$1.8m. All up, insiders sold more shares in Hingham Institution for Savings than they bought, over the last year. The sellers received a price of around US$211, on average. It’s not particularly great to see insiders were selling shares around current prices. While some insiders have decided to take some money off the table, we wouldn’t put too much weight on this fact. You can see a visual depiction of insider transactions over the last 12 months, below. If you want to know exactly who sold, for how much, and when, simply click on the graph below!

NasdaqGM:HIFS Insider Trading January 2nd 19

For those who like to find winning investments this free list of growing companies with recent insider purchasing, could be just the ticket.

Hingham Institution for Savings Insiders Are Selling The Stock

Over the last three months, we’ve seen notably more insider selling, than insider buying, at Hingham Institution for Savings. We note insiders cashed in US$799k worth of shares. On the flip side, Chief Information Officer & VP Joseph Bears spent US$6.2k on purchasing shares. Since the selling really does outweigh the buying, we’d say that these transactions may suggest that some insiders feel the shares are not cheap.

Insider Ownership of Hingham Institution for Savings

Many investors like to check how much of a company is owned by insiders. I reckon it’s a good sign if insiders own a significant number of shares in the company. Hingham Institution for Savings insiders own about US$105m worth of shares (which is 25% of the company). I like to see this level of insider ownership, because it increases the chances that management are thinking about the best interests of shareholders.

So What Do The Hingham Institution for Savings Insider Transactions Indicate?

The stark truth for Hingham Institution for Savings is that there has been more insider selling than insider buying in the last three months. Zooming out, the longer term picture doesn’t give us much comfort. On the plus side, Hingham Institution for Savings makes money, and is growing profits. It is good to see high insider ownership, but the insider selling leaves us cautious. I like to dive deeper into how a company has performed in the past. You can access this interactive graph of past earnings, revenue and cash flow for free .

But note: Hingham Institution for Savings may not be the best stock to buy. So take a peek at this free list of interesting companies with high ROE and low debt.

To help readers see past the short term volatility of the financial market, we aim to bring you a long-term focused research analysis purely driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis does not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements.

The author is an independent contributor and at the time of publication had no position in the stocks mentioned. For errors that warrant correction please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com.