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Introducing CEPS (LON:CEPS), A Stock That Climbed 33% In The Last Year

Simply Wall St

These days it's easy to simply buy an index fund, and your returns should (roughly) match the market. But one can do better than that by picking better than average stocks (as part of a diversified portfolio). For example, the CEPS PLC (LON:CEPS) share price is up 33% in the last year, clearly besting the market return of around 6.5% (not including dividends). So that should have shareholders smiling. In contrast, the longer term returns are negative, since the share price is 12% lower than it was three years ago.

See our latest analysis for CEPS

Given that CEPS didn't make a profit in the last twelve months, we'll focus on revenue growth to form a quick view of its business development. Shareholders of unprofitable companies usually expect strong revenue growth. That's because fast revenue growth can be easily extrapolated to forecast profits, often of considerable size.

Over the last twelve months, CEPS's revenue grew by 41%. We respect that sort of growth, no doubt. While the share price performed well, gaining 33% over twelve months, you could argue the revenue growth warranted it. If the company can maintain the revenue growth, the share price could go higher still. But before deciding this growth stock is underappreciated, you might want to check out profitability trends (and cash flow)

The image below shows how earnings and revenue have tracked over time (if you click on the image you can see greater detail).

AIM:CEPS Income Statement, February 24th 2020

Balance sheet strength is crucial. It might be well worthwhile taking a look at our free report on how its financial position has changed over time.

A Different Perspective

It's good to see that CEPS has rewarded shareholders with a total shareholder return of 33% in the last twelve months. That certainly beats the loss of about 1.8% per year over the last half decade. We generally put more weight on the long term performance over the short term, but the recent improvement could hint at a (positive) inflection point within the business. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. For example, we've discovered 4 warning signs for CEPS (2 don't sit too well with us!) that you should be aware of before investing here.

Of course, you might find a fantastic investment by looking elsewhere. So take a peek at this free list of companies we expect will grow earnings.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on GB exchanges.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

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