U.S. Markets close in 3 hrs 20 mins

Introducing L.S. Starrett (NYSE:SCX), The Stock That Slid 70% In The Last Five Years

Simply Wall St

The L.S. Starrett Company (NYSE:SCX) shareholders should be happy to see the share price up 10% in the last quarter. But that can't change the reality that over the longer term (five years), the returns have been really quite dismal. In fact, the share price has declined rather badly, down some 70% in that time. So we're hesitant to put much weight behind the short term increase. We'd err towards caution given the long term under-performance.

View our latest analysis for L.S. Starrett

In his essay The Superinvestors of Graham-and-Doddsville Warren Buffett described how share prices do not always rationally reflect the value of a business. By comparing earnings per share (EPS) and share price changes over time, we can get a feel for how investor attitudes to a company have morphed over time.

During five years of share price growth, L.S. Starrett moved from a loss to profitability. Most would consider that to be a good thing, so it's counter-intuitive to see the share price declining. Other metrics might give us a better handle on how its value is changing over time.

The revenue fall of 2.1% per year for five years is neither good nor terrible. But if the market expected durable top line growth, then that could explain the share price weakness.

The company's revenue and earnings (over time) are depicted in the image below (click to see the exact numbers).

NYSE:SCX Income Statement, January 14th 2020

We like that insiders have been buying shares in the last twelve months. Even so, future earnings will be far more important to whether current shareholders make money. Before buying or selling a stock, we always recommend a close examination of historic growth trends, available here..

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

Investors should note that there's a difference between L.S. Starrett's total shareholder return (TSR) and its share price change, which we've covered above. The TSR is a return calculation that accounts for the value of cash dividends (assuming that any dividend received was reinvested) and the calculated value of any discounted capital raisings and spin-offs. Dividends have been really beneficial for L.S. Starrett shareholders, and that cash payout explains why its total shareholder loss of 66%, over the last 5 years, isn't as bad as the share price return.

A Different Perspective

L.S. Starrett shareholders are up 3.6% for the year. Unfortunately this falls short of the market return. On the bright side, that's still a gain, and it is certainly better than the yearly loss of about 19% endured over half a decade. It could well be that the business is stabilizing. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. Consider for instance, the ever-present spectre of investment risk. We've identified 1 warning sign with L.S. Starrett , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

L.S. Starrett is not the only stock insiders are buying. So take a peek at this free list of growing companies with insider buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.