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Introducing Silicom (NASDAQ:SILC), The Stock That Dropped 24% In The Last Year

Simply Wall St

The simplest way to benefit from a rising market is to buy an index fund. Active investors aim to buy stocks that vastly outperform the market - but in the process, they risk under-performance. That downside risk was realized by Silicom Ltd. (NASDAQ:SILC) shareholders over the last year, as the share price declined 24%. That's disappointing when you consider the market returned 7.5%. At least the damage isn't so bad if you look at the last three years, since the stock is down 15% in that time. The falls have accelerated recently, with the share price down 21% in the last three months. This could be related to the recent financial results - you can catch up on the most recent data by reading our company report.

View our latest analysis for Silicom

There is no denying that markets are sometimes efficient, but prices do not always reflect underlying business performance. One way to examine how market sentiment has changed over time is to look at the interaction between a company's share price and its earnings per share (EPS).

During the unfortunate twelve months during which the Silicom share price fell, it actually saw its earnings per share (EPS) improve by 22%. Of course, the situation might betray previous over-optimism about growth. The divergence between the EPS and the share price is quite notable, during the year. So it's well worth checking out some other metrics, too.

Silicom's revenue is actually up 4.0% over the last year. Since we can't easily explain the share price movement based on these metrics, it might be worth considering how market sentiment has changed towards the stock.

The company's revenue and earnings (over time) are depicted in the image below (click to see the exact numbers).

NasdaqGS:SILC Income Statement, July 27th 2019

We know that Silicom has improved its bottom line lately, but what does the future have in store? You can see what analysts are predicting for Silicom in this interactive graph of future profit estimates.

What about the Total Shareholder Return (TSR)?

We've already covered Silicom's share price action, but we should also mention its total shareholder return (TSR). Arguably the TSR is a more complete return calculation because it accounts for the value of dividends (as if they were reinvested), along with the hypothetical value of any discounted capital that have been offered to shareholders. Its history of dividend payouts mean that Silicom's TSR, which was a 24% drop over the last year, was not as bad as the share price return.

A Different Perspective

While the broader market gained around 7.5% in the last year, Silicom shareholders lost 24%. Even the share prices of good stocks drop sometimes, but we want to see improvements in the fundamental metrics of a business, before getting too interested. Longer term investors wouldn't be so upset, since they would have made 4.9%, each year, over five years. If the fundamental data continues to indicate long term sustainable growth, the current sell-off could be an opportunity worth considering. Most investors take the time to check the data on insider transactions. You can click here to see if insiders have been buying or selling.

We will like Silicom better if we see some big insider buys. While we wait, check out this free list of growing companies with considerable, recent, insider buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.