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Investors Who Bought Power Integrations (NASDAQ:POWI) Shares Five Years Ago Are Now Up 145%

Simply Wall St

It might be of some concern to shareholders to see the Power Integrations, Inc. (NASDAQ:POWI) share price down 13% in the last month. But that scarcely detracts from the really solid long term returns generated by the company over five years. In fact, the share price is 145% higher today. Generally speaking the long term returns will give you a better idea of business quality than short periods can. Ultimately business performance will determine whether the stock price continues the positive long term trend.

View our latest analysis for Power Integrations

There is no denying that markets are sometimes efficient, but prices do not always reflect underlying business performance. By comparing earnings per share (EPS) and share price changes over time, we can get a feel for how investor attitudes to a company have morphed over time.

During five years of share price growth, Power Integrations achieved compound earnings per share (EPS) growth of 35% per year. The EPS growth is more impressive than the yearly share price gain of 20% over the same period. So it seems the market isn't so enthusiastic about the stock these days.

You can see how EPS has changed over time in the image below (click on the chart to see the exact values).

earnings-per-share-growth
earnings-per-share-growth

It is of course excellent to see how Power Integrations has grown profits over the years, but the future is more important for shareholders. If you are thinking of buying or selling Power Integrations stock, you should check out this FREE detailed report on its balance sheet.

What About Dividends?

It is important to consider the total shareholder return, as well as the share price return, for any given stock. The TSR incorporates the value of any spin-offs or discounted capital raisings, along with any dividends, based on the assumption that the dividends are reinvested. So for companies that pay a generous dividend, the TSR is often a lot higher than the share price return. As it happens, Power Integrations' TSR for the last 5 years was 156%, which exceeds the share price return mentioned earlier. The dividends paid by the company have thusly boosted the total shareholder return.

A Different Perspective

Power Integrations shareholders gained a total return of 9.9% during the year. Unfortunately this falls short of the market return. It's probably a good sign that the company has an even better long term track record, having provided shareholders with an annual TSR of 21% over five years. Maybe the share price is just taking a breather while the business executes on its growth strategy. It's always interesting to track share price performance over the longer term. But to understand Power Integrations better, we need to consider many other factors. Take risks, for example - Power Integrations has 3 warning signs (and 1 which is concerning) we think you should know about.

We will like Power Integrations better if we see some big insider buys. While we wait, check out this free list of growing companies with considerable, recent, insider buying.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team@simplywallst.com.