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Investors Who Bought New Senior Investment Group (NYSE:SNR) Shares Three Years Ago Are Now Down 35%

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Simply Wall St
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Many investors define successful investing as beating the market average over the long term. But its virtually certain that sometimes you will buy stocks that fall short of the market average returns. Unfortunately, that's been the case for longer term New Senior Investment Group Inc. (NYSE:SNR) shareholders, since the share price is down 35% in the last three years, falling well short of the market return of around 46%. On the other hand, we note it's up 8.3% in about a month.

See our latest analysis for New Senior Investment Group

Because New Senior Investment Group is loss-making, we think the market is probably more focussed on revenue and revenue growth, at least for now. When a company doesn't make profits, we'd generally expect to see good revenue growth. That's because it's hard to be confident a company will be sustainable if revenue growth is negligible, and it never makes a profit.

Over the last three years, New Senior Investment Group's revenue dropped 1.5% per year. That's not what investors generally want to see. The stock has disappointed holders over the last three years, falling 13%, annualized. That makes sense given the lack of either profits or revenue growth. Of course, sentiment could become too negative, and the company may actually be making progress to profitability.

You can see how earnings and revenue have changed over time in the image below (click on the chart to see the exact values).

NYSE:SNR Income Statement, October 15th 2019
NYSE:SNR Income Statement, October 15th 2019

If you are thinking of buying or selling New Senior Investment Group stock, you should check out this FREE detailed report on its balance sheet.

What About Dividends?

It is important to consider the total shareholder return, as well as the share price return, for any given stock. The TSR incorporates the value of any spin-offs or discounted capital raisings, along with any dividends, based on the assumption that the dividends are reinvested. So for companies that pay a generous dividend, the TSR is often a lot higher than the share price return. We note that for New Senior Investment Group the TSR over the last 3 years was -10%, which is better than the share price return mentioned above. And there's no prize for guessing that the dividend payments largely explain the divergence!

A Different Perspective

We're pleased to report that New Senior Investment Group rewarded shareholders with a total shareholder return of 27% over the last year. That includes the value of the dividend. This recent result is much better than the 3.5% drop suffered by shareholders each year (on average) over the last three. We're generally cautious about putting too much weigh on shorter term data, but the recent improvement is definitely a positive. Before forming an opinion on New Senior Investment Group you might want to consider the cold hard cash it pays as a dividend. This free chart tracks its dividend over time.

If you would prefer to check out another company -- one with potentially superior financials -- then do not miss this free list of companies that have proven they can grow earnings.

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on US exchanges.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.