U.S. markets open in 1 hour 30 minutes
  • S&P Futures

    3,675.75
    +11.25 (+0.31%)
     
  • Dow Futures

    30,055.00
    +123.00 (+0.41%)
     
  • Nasdaq Futures

    12,496.25
    +34.00 (+0.27%)
     
  • Russell 2000 Futures

    1,859.00
    +11.80 (+0.64%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    46.06
    +0.42 (+0.92%)
     
  • Gold

    1,845.70
    +4.60 (+0.25%)
     
  • Silver

    24.36
    +0.23 (+0.94%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.2162
    +0.0013 (+0.11%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    0.9200
    0.0000 (0.00%)
     
  • Vix

    21.12
    -0.05 (-0.24%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.3463
    +0.0011 (+0.08%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    103.9950
    +0.1350 (+0.13%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    18,969.58
    -288.00 (-1.50%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    371.76
    -2.64 (-0.71%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    6,544.60
    +54.33 (+0.84%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    26,751.24
    -58.13 (-0.22%)
     

Christmas text scam targeting Royal Mail customers with iPhone 11 offer

Kalila Sangster
Derby, United Kingdom - July, 22th 2011: Postal delivering car of Royal Mail with logo and crown in Derby, England making a stop at traffic light. It is national postal service of the United King. Royal Mail was founded in 1516.
The scam message tells users they've won an iPhone and asks them to enter their card details. Photo: Getty

Several members of the public have reported receiving a scam text from Royal Mail telling them they’ve won a new iPhone11.

Royal Mail customers say the seemingly genuine text message tells them there is an item waiting to be collected by them, with a hyperlink included in the text.

The seasonal scam message reads: “You took one of the spots on our Currys XMAS-list.”

When users click the link, they are redirected to a website that has the heading of Currys/PC World, which asks them to enter a few personal details. The site then shows an alert which says:

READ MORE: Christmas shoppers warned to avoid buying dangerous 'fake toys'

“Approved!

“Your chosen iPhone 11 Pro can be delivered inside 5 working days.

“Please confirm your delivery address and pay a small fee (£2.00) for insured shipping.”

Some users reported that when they click the confirm button at the bottom of the site they are taken to another website called “winanticipation” where they are asked for their card details to pay a small fee of £1 to receive the prize.

Several users took to Twitter to voice their concerns.

One person tweeted: “Hi there @RoyalMail. I received the below text from you today – is it a scam? If I follow it through it goes to a @curryspcworld prize!”

READ MORE: Bank transfer scam victims left unprotected as 'no consensus' on regulation

Another wrote: “@RoyalMailHelp, is this some sort of new scam or a new feature you guys have introduced?

“It’s not the first thing I’ve gotten a text like this from an alleged Royal Mail number.”

Royal Mail responded to people on Twitter by saying it was “aware of the SMS and is currently investigating.”