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Jay Eitner - On Using Technology to Improve Curriculums

MOUNT LAUREL, NJ / ACCESSWIRE / April 1, 2017 / Technology is continuously transforming the way we think, study, receive and share information. Computers have already irreversibly reshaped how we interact with data and gain knowledge across all age groups. As we progress into a more digitalized world, it is crucial to acknowledge the benefits of incorporating new technologies into many aspects of our education system, including developing and improving school curriculums. Jay Eitner, nationally recognized educator and outspoken advocate of public school system modernization, talks about the importance of adapting modern technologies as an essential part of curriculum and ultimately ensuring the delivery of vital skills to young generations.

Students today have a greater degree of access to information than ever before. Educators need to understand that young generations enter the school system with a completely different set of expectations, seeking an environment as similarly interactive and engaging as that provided through the screens of their computers. Classrooms are no longer limited to teacher-student interaction only. In today’s modern world, you can browse through the Library of Congress’s music archives to compliment a music class or take an exciting virtual field trip with your students to discover the collection of the Louvre Museum in Paris without ever leaving the school building. It is becoming increasingly popular worldwide to pursue distance learning degrees from universities offering their courses via the Internet, challenging traditional face-to-face learning norms.

Technologies enrich institutional activities and boost soft skills amongst students by fostering communication, creativity and critical thinking in a math and writing-oriented education system.

Additionally, the implementation of instructional multimedia software and web-based materials helps to make use of class hours more effectively, delivering course material in a captivating manner via online lectures or audio-video materials thus allowing additional time for teachers to focus on the more challenging aspects of a given subject. This model is ideally suited for use in primary or secondary education settings and has proven to be successful by various studies.

Modern advancements have become beneficial to more than just the student; they can also be used for the effective professional development of teachers, administrators and even parents. Jay Eitner provides complimentary webinars, podcasts, and e-books on all aspects of the topic at EitnerEducation.com. The presentations often discuss how educators can greatly benefit from free and underutilized technology and apps, including Prezi, Powerpoint, Excel, SMART Boards, and other audio-video material and web-based content, while developing curriculum to meet the ever-changing needs of their students.

For much of his career as an educator, Jay Eitner has advocated for student-centered and data-driven classrooms. He began his journey in public education as a teacher working in Roseville, New Jersey before moving to nationally recognized schools in East Brunswick. Mr. Eitner's dedication to help advance educational opportunities for his students resulted in the receipt of over $140,000 in grants to fund various programs from the purchase of podcasting equipment to creating a fully-interactive gold rush experience learning model. His commitment to students and his achievements in New Jersey’s public school system have earned him the educators’ choice pick for the national Superintendent of the Year for the BAMMY awards in 2015.

Jay Eitner - Nationally Recognized Pioneer in the Field of Education: http://jayeitnernews.com

Jay Eitner - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jason.eitner

Jay Eitner - Attends the AASA 2017 National Conference on Education: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/jay-eitner-attends-aasa-2017-193500622.html

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SOURCE: Jay Eitner