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Jobs Report, Consumer Credit, Stimulus: 3 Things to Watch

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·2 min read
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By Liz Moyer

Investing.com -- Stocks rose for a third day on Thursday as lawmakers moved ahead on President Joe Biden’s stimulus plan.

Improving economic data lifted Wall Street’s bullish mood after better than expected numbers on jobless claims. First-time claims fell last week and were lower than estimates.

That sets up expectations for Friday’s critical nonfarm jobs report from the government, always a barometer of economic health. The good news and a speedier rollout of Covid-19 vaccines, helped push bond yields higher, with the difference between short and long-term Treasury yields at their widest in five years.

Banks benefited, because higher yields allows them to make more money off loan products. But the technology sector also notched gains after PayPal and eBay (NASDAQ:EBAY) had positive earnings surprises.

So-called meme stocks like GameStop (NYSE:GME) and AMC Entertainment (NYSE:AMC) fell as the Robinhood crowd’s short squeeze from last month petered out.

Here are three things that could affect markets tomorrow:

1. January’s Nonfarm payroll report

Has the economy improved since December? There’s reason for optimism, according to the estimate for Friday’s nonfarm jobs report from the government.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics will release numbers at 8:30 AM ET (1230 GMT). Analysts are expecting 50,000 jobs were added last month after dropping 140,000 in December.

2. A reading on consumer credit

The consumer credit reading for December will be released at 3:00 PM ET and is expected to be $12 billion, down from $15.7 billion in November. That dip might be in line with the jobs report, which showed attrition in employment going into the holiday season.

The November report was a positive surprise as consumers continued to tap sources of credit like auto and student loans, but not their credit cards.

3. Biden’s $1.9 trillion stimulus

Looks like Democrats are ditching the bi-partisan spirit and forging ahead with their $1.9 trillion stimulus package. Investors don’t hate the idea, as the stock market has shown gains this week while lawmakers maneuver on Capitol Hill.

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