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Do You Know What H.B. Fuller Company's (NYSE:FUL) P/E Ratio Means?

Simply Wall St
·4 mins read

This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). We'll look at H.B. Fuller Company's (NYSE:FUL) P/E ratio and reflect on what it tells us about the company's share price. Based on the last twelve months, H.B. Fuller's P/E ratio is 18.56. That corresponds to an earnings yield of approximately 5.4%.

View our latest analysis for H.B. Fuller

How Do You Calculate A P/E Ratio?

The formula for P/E is:

Price to Earnings Ratio = Price per Share ÷ Earnings per Share (EPS)

Or for H.B. Fuller:

P/E of 18.56 = USD47.69 ÷ USD2.57 (Based on the year to November 2019.)

Is A High Price-to-Earnings Ratio Good?

A higher P/E ratio means that investors are paying a higher price for each USD1 of company earnings. All else being equal, it's better to pay a low price -- but as Warren Buffett said, 'It's far better to buy a wonderful company at a fair price than a fair company at a wonderful price'.

Does H.B. Fuller Have A Relatively High Or Low P/E For Its Industry?

The P/E ratio essentially measures market expectations of a company. The image below shows that H.B. Fuller has a lower P/E than the average (22.4) P/E for companies in the chemicals industry.

NYSE:FUL Price Estimation Relative to Market, February 20th 2020
NYSE:FUL Price Estimation Relative to Market, February 20th 2020

This suggests that market participants think H.B. Fuller will underperform other companies in its industry. Many investors like to buy stocks when the market is pessimistic about their prospects. If you consider the stock interesting, further research is recommended. For example, I often monitor director buying and selling.

How Growth Rates Impact P/E Ratios

P/E ratios primarily reflect market expectations around earnings growth rates. That's because companies that grow earnings per share quickly will rapidly increase the 'E' in the equation. And in that case, the P/E ratio itself will drop rather quickly. Then, a lower P/E should attract more buyers, pushing the share price up.

H.B. Fuller's earnings per share fell by 24% in the last twelve months. But over the longer term (5 years) earnings per share have increased by 21%.

A Limitation: P/E Ratios Ignore Debt and Cash In The Bank

The 'Price' in P/E reflects the market capitalization of the company. That means it doesn't take debt or cash into account. In theory, a company can lower its future P/E ratio by using cash or debt to invest in growth.

Such spending might be good or bad, overall, but the key point here is that you need to look at debt to understand the P/E ratio in context.

How Does H.B. Fuller's Debt Impact Its P/E Ratio?

H.B. Fuller has net debt worth 76% of its market capitalization. If you want to compare its P/E ratio to other companies, you should absolutely keep in mind it has significant borrowings.

The Bottom Line On H.B. Fuller's P/E Ratio

H.B. Fuller's P/E is 18.6 which is about average (18.3) in the US market. With relatively high debt, and no earnings per share growth over twelve months, the P/E suggests that many have an expectation that company will find some growth.

When the market is wrong about a stock, it gives savvy investors an opportunity. People often underestimate remarkable growth -- so investors can make money when fast growth is not fully appreciated. So this free visual report on analyst forecasts could hold the key to an excellent investment decision.

Of course, you might find a fantastic investment by looking at a few good candidates. So take a peek at this free list of companies with modest (or no) debt, trading on a P/E below 20.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Thank you for reading.