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Las Vegas slogan 'What Happens Here, Stays Here' is about to change

Edward Lawrence

The popular Las Vegas slogan “What Happens Here, Stays Here” will be retired by Sin City, FOX Business has confirmed. A new catchphrase will be unveiled in a multimillion-dollar advertising campaign later this month.

Steven Hill the CEO and President of Las Vegas Convention and Visitor Authority tells sources close to FOX Business the rebranding will start Jan 26, 2020. A source familiar with the campaign says the LVCVA plans a large national ad buy during the Grammy Awards.

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The new tag line which will be at the center of the city selling itself to the world as a convention and vacation destination will be announced then.

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In 2019, the city had over 39 million visitors and hosts massive conventions including CES which is organized by the Consumer Technology Association. It is also known, of course, for its gambling, over-the-top hotels on the strip as well as fine dining and shows.

Las Vegas, home to veteran entertainers such as Wayne Newton and the retired act Sigfried and Roy, has seen a resurgence in entertainers including Celine Dion, Cher, Elton John, Brittany Spears, and Mariah Carey to name a few. These acts take up lucrative residencies for months at a time.

R&R Partners developed the “What Happens Here, Stays Here” line in 2003 and created the rebranded version that will be unveiled later this month.

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While details are scarce, rock band Aerosmith gave a hint on the new campaign via Instagram. The longtime rockers, led by frontman Steven Tyler and guitarist Joe Perry, are in residency at MGM.

The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority has an annual budget of $360 Million. The LVCVA spends $100 million a year on all advertising and the latest rebranding will take a “significant” part of the advertising budget sources tell FOX Business.

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Rumors of the slogan change were first reported late last year.

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