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LATAM POLITICS TODAY-Bolivia's Morales calls on Chile's Boric to back sea access

·3 min read

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IDB directors recommend firing Claver-Carone

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Wave of indigenous women run for Brazil's Congress

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Former Brazilian president steps back from election debate

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Argentine oil workers strike after deadly refinery blast

Sept 22 (Reuters) - The latest in Latin American politics today:

Evo Morales takes swipe at Gabriel Boric over sea access

Former Bolivian President Evo Morales on Thursday addressed the president of neighboring Chile, Gabriel Boric, over his position on a restoration of sea access for Bolivia.

Bolivia lost access to the Pacific Ocean in 1884 following a war with Chile.

After Boric condemned Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the violation of its neighbor's sovereignty at the United Nations this week, Morales tweeted: "I have confidence that you will assume the same position in relation to the 1879 invasion and reaffirm your proposal of #SeaForBolivia."

Boric has in the past expressed openness to restoring sea access for Bolivia, but walked back the position after taking office in March. The two countries have not had formal diplomatic relations since 1978.

IDB directors vote to recommend firing Claver-Carone

WASHINGTON - The Inter-American Development Bank's (IDB) board of directors voted unanimously to recommend the removal of President Mauricio Claver-Carone following an independent ethics investigation, two sources familiar with the vote said.

The IDB's governing board will make a final decision within the next week on the removal of the president of Latin America's largest development bank, the sources said.

Claver-Carone met earlier Thursday with the bank's 14 directors to discuss an investigation by law firm Davis Polk that found evidence to support whistleblower allegations that he had an intimate relationship with a subordinate.

Indigenous women eye Brazil's Congress in Bolsonaro backlash

SAO PAULO - A record number of 60 indigenous leaders, including 31 women, is running for federal office in Brazil's election next month, in a backlash against the policies of President Jair Bolsonaro.

Many say their main objective is to unwind the policies of Bolsonaro, who has stopped designating any new indigenous territory and pushed for mining and industrial farming on existing reservations, emboldening violent land grabs and illegal miners.

Meanwhile, of over 30 transgender candidates running for office, researchers say 80% have received threats or been intimidated this election cycle.

Brazilian ex-president makes what could be last voter pitch

Brazil's influential former President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, who served two terms between 1995 and 2002, said in a tweet he would step back from political debate due to his age, but offered final thoughts on the coming Oct. 2 presidential vote.

"I'm old and though I don't have any serious health problems, I no longer have the energy to actively participate in the pre-election political debate," he tweeted, adding that he asks voters to back whoever is "committed to fighting poverty and inequality... and the strengthening of institutions," among other largely liberal causes.

Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva had in May published a photo of the two former presidents fist-bumping in masks, a move seen to bring Brazil's left and center closer to uniting against Bolsonaro, who is trailing Lula in the polls.

Argentine oil workers strike after deadly refinery blast

BUENOS AIRES - Argentina's largest oil union said it launched an indefinite strike on Thursday to demand greater safety measures after an explosion at a refinery in the western province of Neuquen killed three people.

Neuquen officials said the cause of the fire, which broke out at dawn in a storage tank at the New American Oil refinery, is still under investigation.

The Private Oil and Gas Union of Rio Negro, Neuquen and La Pampa covers some 25,000 workers and activities at Vaca Muerta, the world's second-largest shale gas reserve. (Compiled by Sarah Morland; Editing by Jonathan Oatis; Editing by Sam Holmes)