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LATAM POLITICS TODAY-Brazil's Petrobras slashes gas prices under pressure from Bolsonaro

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* Mexican president aims to finish 'Mayan Train' by end of 2023

* Record number of migrants cross Rio Grande to Texas from Mexico

* 12 killed in Ecuador prison riot, government says

* No end in sight for Cuba blackouts

July 19 (Reuters) - The latest in Latin American politics today:

Brazil's Petrobras gasoline price cut

SAO PAULO - Brazilian state-run oil company Petrobras has said it will reduce gasoline prices at its refineries by about 5% starting on Wednesday, its first price cut since late 2021.

Average prices will drop to 3.86 reais ($0.7136) per liter from 4.06 reais, the company said in a statement.

There have been three consecutive price hikes this year.

The move represents a relief for President Jair Bolsonaro amid his uphill re-election battle. He trails former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva in opinion polls ahead of the October vote as high consumer prices hurt his popularity.

Mexican president gives 'Mayan Train' project national security status

MEXICO CITY - Mexican President Andres Manual Lopez Obrador has deemed the country's "Mayan Train" a matter of national security, in a move that may help disentangle the flagship project from several pending legal injunctions stalling construction.

Work on the multi-billion dollar project, which aims to link tourist zones in the Yucatan Peninsula, will continue under this new status, Lopez Obrador said in a regular news conference.

He insisted the infrastructure project will be done by the end of next year.

By raft and on foot, migrants cross Rio Grande to Texas from Mexico

EAGLE PASS, Texas - Beneath a blazing sun, a record number of migrants seeking to enter the United States are crossing the Mexican border. Some wade or swim through the waters of the Rio Grande into Texas. Smugglers ferry groups of others on rafts.

U.S. President Joe Biden, a Democrat, promised a more humane border policy than that of his Republican predecessor Donald Trump, but the increase in numbers has challenged U.S. law enforcement and drawn criticism from both political parties.

Ecuador says 12 killed in prison riot, still identifying dismembered bodies

SANTO DOMINGO, Ecuador - Ecuador's government says it is still trying to identify the dismembered bodies of inmates following a prison riot in the city of Santo Domingo and lowered the death toll to 12 from the 13 initially announced.

"Crime scene investigation teams have collected 45 human parts in the Santo Domingo penitentiary, which are 12 bodies and not 13," Interior Minister Patricio Carrillo said on Twitter.

Monday's violence - which the government blamed on fighting between gangs within the Bellavista prison - is the latest incident of prison violence in the Andean country.

Cuba says no short-term fix for blackouts

HAVANA - Cash-strapped Cuba has delivered the bad news to residents that there is no end in sight to blackouts disrupting their lives and the economy.

Power outages were a major cause of widespread demonstrations a year ago and still beset the island even as the protest movement mostly died out. (Compiled by Steven Grattan; editing by Grant McCool)