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The Latest: Case over WV governor's residency continues

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Governor Home-Lawsuit

FILE - In this July 7, 2016 file photo Jim Justice, owner of The Greenbrier Resort, speaks to members of Team Greenbrier during a news conference in front of the hotel in White Sulphur Springs W.Va. Can Gov. Jim Justice be forced to live in the state capital? A persistent lawsuit seeking to do just that is heading back to court. A hearing in the case brought by Democratic Del. Isaac Sponaugle is scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019 in Charleston. Justice has acknowledged that he lives in Lewisburg, a city about 100 miles (160 kilometers) from the governor’s mansion in Charleston but not far from The Greenbrier, a lavish resort he owns that hosts a PGA tour and has been the site of an annual congressional getaway. (Rick Barbero/The Register-Herald via AP, file)

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — The Latest on A lawsuit attempting to force West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice to live in the capital (all times local):

1 p.m.

Can the governor of West Virginia be forced to live in the state capital? A lawsuit seeking to do just that is still in play.

A judge in West Virginia on Wednesday requested additional documents in the case against Gov. Jim Justice, further extending the long-running suit.

Democratic Del. Isaac Sponaugle filed the case and says Justice should be required to live in Charleston because the state Constitution says the governor must "reside at the seat of government." He has filed two similar suits but they were thrown out on technicalities.

Justice's lawyers argue that the definition of the word reside is unclear and say the governor is in Charleston when he needs to be.

Justice has said he lives in Lewisburg, not at the governor's mansion.

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1:05 a.m.

Can the governor of West Virginia be forced to live in the state capital? A persistent lawsuit seeking to do just that is heading back to court.

A hearing in the case brought by Democratic Del. Isaac Sponaugle against Republican Gov. Jim Justice is scheduled for Wednesday in Charleston.

Sponaugle says Justice should be ordered to live in Charleston because the state Constitution requires the governor to "reside at the seat of government."

Justice's lawyers argue that the definition of the word reside is unclear. They've also questioned the court's ability to chaperone Justice's whereabouts.

Justice has said he lives in Lewisburg, not at the governor's mansion. He is frequently criticized for not being at the statehouse.

This is the third time Sponaugle has sued over Justice's residency, with the previous two suits thrown out on technicalities.