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The Latest: Trump says he'll rid DoJ of 'lingering stench'

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (all times local):

8:05 p.m.

President Donald Trump is pledging to rid the Justice Department of its "lingering stench."

Trump told a campaign rally in Missouri on Friday that the department has some "great people" but also "some real bad ones."

He says the bad ones are gone, "but there's a lingering stench and we're going to get rid of that, too."

It was unclear what Trump was referring to and he didn't name names. But he has been in a running war with the Justice Department, starting with Jeff Sessions, his hand-picked attorney general.

Trump commented after The New York Times reported Friday that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein floated the idea of using the 25th Amendment to remove Trump on grounds that he's unfit for office. Rosenstein said the report is inaccurate.

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3:45 p.m.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer says President Donald Trump must not use a newspaper report about Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein as a reason to fire him.

The New York Times reported Friday that Rosenstein floated the idea of using the 25th Amendment to remove Trump on grounds that he's unfit for office and suggested secretly recording Trump to expose chaos in the administration.

Rosenstein denies the report.

Schumer says the report must not be used for the "corrupt purpose" of firing Rosenstein. Schumer says other top administration officials remain in their jobs despite having had critical comments about Trump attributed to them.

Rosenstein oversees the investigation into possible coordination between Trump's presidential campaign and Russia.

Trump says the investigation is a "witch hunt" and has frequently targeted Rosenstein.

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2:30 p.m.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein is denying a New York Times report that he floated the idea of using the 25th Amendment to remove President Donald Trump as unfit for office and suggested secretly recording the president to expose the chaos in the administration.

The Times cited several people, who were not named, who described the episodes that came in the spring of 2017 after FBI Director James Comey was fired.

Rosenstein says, "The New York Times' story is inaccurate and factually incorrect."

He adds, "Based on my personal dealings with the president, there is no basis to invoke the 25th Amendment."