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March AARP Bulletin: Smart Money Action Plan By Suze Orman

March AARP Bulletin: Smart Money Action Plan By Suze Orman

March AARP Bulletin: Smart Money Action Plan By Suze Orman

PR Newswire

In An Exclusive Adaptation from Her New Book, Orman Reveals the 10 Crucial Steps to Take Right Now for a Secure and Happy Retirement

WASHINGTON, Feb. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- You don't stumble into a great retirement, you plan it and then make it happen, says Suze Orman, one of America's most beloved and respected money experts in the new issue of AARP Bulletin. To help all Americans over 50 realize their retirement dreams, Suze provides a list of 10 things to do RIGHT NOW to make sure that you have the resources you need to have a secure and happy future, no matter how many decades long it turns out to be.

These steps – from "rightsizing" your car to recalibrating your financial relationship with your children – are appropriate for anyone 50 or over to take ... and the sooner done, the better! Underlying them all is your greatest asset, says Suze: "Your spirit – your attitude – is the key component in creating your ultimate retirement."

Adapted from her new book "The Ultimate Retirement Guide for 50+: Winning Strategies to Make Your Money Last a Lifetime," Suze's Smart Money Action Plan also contains heartwarming – and heartbreaking – stories from Orman's life. In addition, she maps out in colorful illustration exactly what to do with the money you save so that you can start to accumulate interest on your new savings-rich life.

Other stories in the March issue include:

In The News

Fraud Watch

Your Health

More information can be found at: http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/

About AARP

AARP is the nation's largest nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to empowering people 50 and older to choose how they live as they age. With a nationwide presence and nearly 38 million members, AARP strengthens communities and advocates for what matters most to families: health security, financial stability and personal fulfillment. AARP also produces the nation's largest circulation publications: AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org or follow @AARP and @AARPadvocates on social media.

 

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SOURCE AARP

AARP national logo. (PRNewsfoto/AARP)
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