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Mass shootings prompted these US companies to change gun policies over the years

Thomas Barrabi

Several U.S. companies have altered their gun sales policies or taken other actions to address a wave of deadly mass shootings around the country in recent years.

U.S. political and business leaders faced renewed calls to address gun violence this week after a pair of deadly shootings over the weekend. At least 22 people died at a Walmart store in El Paso, Texas, after a shooter opened fire on shoppers on Saturday morning. Within hours of that attack, at least nine people died after a gunman opened fire outside of a bar in Dayton, Ohio.

“We cannot let those killed in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, die in vain. Likewise for those so seriously wounded,” President Trump wrote on Twitter. “We can never forget them, and those many who came before them. Republicans and Democrats must come together and get strong background checks, perhaps marrying this legislation with desperately needed immigration reform.”

FOX Business breaks how companies have responded to the mass shooting epidemic below, as compiled by Reuters.

Bank of America

Shortly after the Parkland, Florida high school shooting, Bank of America said it would end financing for all companies that produce military-style firearms for civilians.

Chubb

The insurance provider stopped underwriting a National Rifle Association-branded policy for gun owners after the Parkland shooting.

Citigroup

In March 2018, the bank said it would require clients to adhere to certain rules regarding gun sales. Retailers must mandate background checks for gun sales, adhere to a 21-and-over age limit and end the sale of bump stocks or high-capacity magazines.

Cloudflare

The web services and cybersecurity firm on Sunday said it would no longer provide support to 8chan, an online message board where the El Paso shooting suspect purportedly posted shortly before the attack. The man suspected of carrying out mass shootings at two mosques in New Zealand was also said to be active on 8chan.

"8chan has repeatedly proven itself to be a cesspool of hate,” Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince said in a blog post explaining the decision.

Dick’s Sporting Goods

The retailer opted to end sales of all assault rifles and enact an age limit on sales of other firearms and ammunition after the Parkland shooting. Company officials acknowledged in subsequent quarterly reports that the decision had hurt sales at its stores.

Hertz Corp.

The rental-car company has ended a discount program for NRA members.

Kroger

The grocery retailer said in March 2018 that it would enact a 21-and-over age limit on gun sales at Fred Meyer locations.

Levi Strauss & Co.

The jeans maker's CEO, Chip Bergh, has called for stronger gun control regulations and said the company would donate $1 million to activists.

L.L. Bean

The retailer, which only sells guns at its flagship store in Maine, said in March 2018 that it would stop selling firearms and ammunition to people under age 21.

Symantec Corp.

The cybersecurity firm ended a discount program on identity theft software for NRA members.

Walmart

A Walmart representative said the company has not made any changes to its gun sales policy in response to the shooting in El Paso. However, the retail giant raised its minimum age to purchase firearms to 21 from 18 in February 2018 after the deadly school shooting in Parkland. The company stopped selling assault-style rifles in 2015.

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