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After Math: Number stations

Andrew Tarantola

It was a week of hodge-podgery for the tech industry. AT&T rolled out its almost-5G service, Amazon finally revealed its Prime membership figures and Facebook continued its multi-year streak as "Company Least Encumbered by Any Discernible Form of Human Ethics". Numbers, because you can't convince me Mark Zuckerberg doesn't cut his own hair.

An employee helps a customer with a smartphone at an AT&T Inc. store in Newport Beach, California, U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 10, 2017. AT&T Inc. shares surged the most in more than eight years after the telecommunications giant posted a surprise wireless subscriber gain in the second quarter, showing it can fend for itself in a cutthroat price war. An offer for unlimited wireless data, bundled with discounted streaming-TV service, helping AT&T bide its time while awaiting regulatory approval to transform into a media powerhouse through the $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner Inc. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

100 locations: AT&T is setting the stage for its new 5G network, which is slated to roll out to a dozen American cities by the end of the year. Ahead of that switch flippage, the company announced this week that it will be debuting a 5G-ish fixed-in-place network as well as a faster version of LTE in parts of Boston, Sacramento and McAllen, Texas.

(Bloomberg via Getty Images) (Chesnot via Getty Images)

70 percent: That's the share of Puerto Rican households who once again have power after the island's latest blackout. And to think, after the US has stood by and done nothing.

PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 20: In this photo illustration the Facebook logo is seen on the screen of an iPhone in front of a computer screen showing a Facebook logo on March 20, 2018 in Paris, France. Cambridge Analytica is accused of collecting the personal information of 50 million users of the Facebook social network without their consent and would have used it to develop software to predict and influence voter voting during the campaign American election according to the New York Times and the Guardian. Facebook share price fell by more than 5% Monday shortly after the opening of Wall Street. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)

1.5 billion users: That whole thing where Mark Zuckerberg went before congress and said he supported enacting GDPR protections for Facebook users outside of Europe? Guess what? He was only kidding!

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20 million installs: Apparently a whole lot of people on the internet are suckers. Google just killed five top-rated ad-blocking apps after AdGuard published a report about how they're laden with extra code that harvests data from websites that you frequent. Great job everyone.

ESSEN, GERMANY - DECEMBER 07: The Amazon Prime Video logo stands at the entrance to the season 2 premiere of 'The Grand Tour' at Grugahalle on December 7, 2017 in Essen, Germany. (Photo by Ant Palmer/Getty Images) (Getty Images/iStockphoto)

100 million members: So, that's how many people in the US subscribe to Amazon Prime. Not sure why the company treated that figure like such a huge secret for so many years, given that a third of the US was in on the game.

NASA's Orion spacecraft awaits the U.S. Navy's USS Anchorage for a ride home. Orion launched into space on a two-orbit, 4.5-hour test flight at 7:05 am EST on Dec. 5, and safely splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, where a combined team from NASA, the Navy and Orion prime contractor Lockheed Martin retrieved it for return to shore on board the Anchorage. It is expected to be off loaded at Naval Base San Diego on Monday. (Photo by VCG Wilson/Corbis via Getty Images) (Getty Images)

1003D printed parts: We're living in the future here, people. Instead of relying on an armada of seamstresses like they did back in the Apollo Era, today's NASA uses 3D printing. In fact, more than 100 pieces of the Orion crew capsule will be additively constructed.

(Corbis via Getty Images) (Engadget)

24/7: Oh yes, this will do wonders for the accident rates in its factories.


  • This article originally appeared on Engadget.