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If you meet with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg, make sure you have 'only good news' (FB)

Sheryl Sandberg
Sheryl Sandberg

Getty

  • The private conference room belonging to Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's chief operating officer, has a sign on the door that says, "only good news," according to NPR.

  • In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Sandberg and her company haven't had a lot of good news to talk about.


If you're meeting with Sheryl Sandberg in her private conference room at Facebook, you best not have anything negative to tell her, because the sign on the door forbids it.

"Only good news," it reads.

That's the word from NPR's Morning Edition, which broadcast its one-on-one interview with the social networking company's chief operating officer on Friday. Unfortunately for Sandberg, NPR's Steve Inskeep didn't abide by the rules of the room, instead pressing her on the company's power and its respect for users privacy in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Obviously the sign on the door is meant as a playful placard, but it's an ironic reminder of the depth of the PR crisis the company now finds itself in.

You can listen to or read Inskeep's full interview on NPR's Morning Edition site.

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