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Meghan Markle 'taught me so much about mental health' says duchess's former hairdresser

Meghan at Prince Charles' 70th birthday party. (Getty Images)

Meghan Markle’s royal hairdresser has praised the duchess for teaching him about good mental health, as he wished her well in her new life in California.

George Northwood, who runs a salon in Fitzrovia, revealed he has been behind some of the Duchess of Sussex’s looks as he shared some of his favourites in a series of posts on Instagram.

He wrote: “It has been an enormous privilege and a lot of fun working with the The Duke and Duchess of Sussex over the past two years.

“I have enjoyed every minute collaborating with this amazing couple who not only champion small businesses but have taught me so much about diversity, equality and the importance of good mental health. Here are a few of their many wonderful moments that I was honoured to be a part of. ⁣⁣

“Harry, Meghan and Archie, wishing you much love and luck for your next exciting chapter! Can’t wait to see you one day soon - and so happy to now be able to share about our special time together.”

Read more: Harry and Meghan 'house hunting in same area Diana hoped to live' as they start California life

The images included her hairstyle for the evening reception of her wedding, relaxed curls for a dinner in Dublin, and a ponytail for the Endeavour Fund Awards - one of her final events as a senior royal.

The celebrity hairdresser, who also works with Alexa Chung and Ellie Goulding, told The Daily Telegraph about his relationship with the Duchess of Sussex.

He said: “I was quite nervous, she was so lovely and down to earth. She said ‘I’m just a Cali girl’.”

Read more: Why are Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stepping back as senior royals?

Northwood, 41, travelled with the Sussexes on their tours, including to Fiji, New Zealand, Australia and Tonga.

He added: “She thought through her outfits and jewellery. She really does put a lot of thought into those details. I always remember wherever we went, she would always try to hero small businesses and local jewellery designers. When we were in Australia, she would always pull out such thoughtful things when we were getting ready, like earrings by a little New Zealand designer. The hair just needed to fit in and feel comfortable.”

Loose curls in Ireland was another of Northwood's favourites. (Getty Images)

The north Londoner also praised her for being a role model and said she and her husband, Prince Harry, had been kind to him throughout their time together.

His tribute to the former actor, who is reported to be house hunting in Malibu, California with her husband Harry, comes as royal photographers shared some of their favourite images of the Sussexes.

Tuesday, 31 March, was the duke and duchess’s last day as senior working royals, as they took a step back to “carve their own path”.

Read more: Meghan leaving the Royal Family was the British people's fault, documentary claims

Joe Little, the managing editor of Majesty magazine, shared the cover of the May 2018 issue, with one of their engagement photos, while Chris Jackson, a prominent royal photographer for Getty, shared his first photo of them, at the Invictus Games in 2017.

Samir Hussein, who was the photographer behind the now iconic umbrella image during their final engagements, also paid tribute to the couple, saying he will miss photographing them.

In stepping back, the Sussexes removed themselves from the Royal Rota, the method by which most UK reporting of the Royal Family takes place.

It means they will not have to put their announcements through a group of UK press before it goes to the public.

Read more: 'You may not see us here': Harry and Meghan share final Instagram post from royal account

However one paparazzo told Yahoo UK they might face more attention in LA, where they will be considered “fair game”.

Harry and Meghan are reported to be looking for a home in Malibu, in the same area where Harry’s mother Diana wanted to live with Dodi Fayed.

They have confirmed they will be paying for their own security but are likely to stay out of the public eye for a few months as the world’s attention focuses on tackling the coronavirus pandemic.

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