U.S. Markets closed
  • S&P Futures

    4,534.50
    +10.25 (+0.23%)
     
  • Dow Futures

    34,977.00
    +67.00 (+0.19%)
     
  • Nasdaq Futures

    15,084.50
    +51.00 (+0.34%)
     
  • Russell 2000 Futures

    2,061.90
    +2.70 (+0.13%)
     
  • Crude Oil

    86.55
    -0.41 (-0.47%)
     
  • Gold

    1,841.50
    -1.70 (-0.09%)
     
  • Silver

    24.24
    +0.01 (+0.04%)
     
  • EUR/USD

    1.1357
    +0.0010 (+0.0909%)
     
  • 10-Yr Bond

    1.8270
    -0.0380 (-2.04%)
     
  • Vix

    23.85
    +1.06 (+4.65%)
     
  • GBP/USD

    1.3627
    +0.0015 (+0.1131%)
     
  • USD/JPY

    114.3270
    -0.0260 (-0.0227%)
     
  • BTC-USD

    41,969.79
    -298.35 (-0.71%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    994.87
    +0.13 (+0.01%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,589.66
    +26.11 (+0.35%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    27,594.29
    +127.06 (+0.46%)
     

Meng Wanzhou's lawyer accuses Canadian border officer of fabricating testimony about phone passcodes

·4 min read

Meng Wanzhou's lawyer has accused a Canadian border agent of falsifying testimony about how the Huawei Technologies executive's phone passwords ended up in the hands of Canadian police.

Canada Border Services Agency officer Scott Kirkland had told Meng's extradition hearing in October that his handwritten note with the passcodes was accidentally turned over to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, in a pile of other documents, after Meng was arrested at Vancouver's airport on December 1, 2018.

Handing over the passcodes breached privacy laws and was a "heart-wrenching" mistake, Kirkland testified.

Get the latest insights and analysis from our Global Impact newsletter on the big stories originating in China.

But this was a "complete fabrication", Tony Paisana, a lawyer for Meng, said at the hearing on Thursday, as he pressed the case that it had been part of an illegal and covert effort to gather evidence against Meng on behalf of the US Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Paisana noted that the supposed mistake had not been documented anywhere by the CBSA: "The inescapable conclusion to draw ... is that BSO [Border Services Officer] Kirkland shared those passcodes not by error or by accident but on purpose."

"Kirkland has been untruthful to you," he told Associate Chief Justice Heather Holmes, in the Supreme Court of British Columbia.

The handwritten note of Meng Wanzhou's phone passcodes provided by Canadian border officer Scott Kirkland to Canadian police on the day of her arrest, in breach of privacy laws. Photo: Supreme Court of British Columbia alt=The handwritten note of Meng Wanzhou's phone passcodes provided by Canadian border officer Scott Kirkland to Canadian police on the day of her arrest, in breach of privacy laws. Photo: Supreme Court of British Columbia

Meng's lawyers contend that Canadian police and border officers unlawfully colluded with the FBI to gather evidence against Meng, in an abuse of process that violated her rights.

The violations, they say, included the border agents' seizure of Meng's electronic devices; compelling her to turn over their passcodes; and questioning her about Huawei's activities that related to US fraud charges against her.

The information obtained during border procedures at the airport, in the hours before Meng's arrest, was then shared with police and others in violation of the policies and laws that govern the Canada Border Services Agency, her lawyers argue.

Canadian government lawyers, representing US interests in the case, said in a written submission that the border officers had a legitimate interest in conducting the examination, amid concerns about Canadian national security and possible criminality by Meng.

Holmes suggested that the border officers' questioning of Meng about Huawei's activities had been cursory. "It's not exactly a grilling examination," she told Paisana, and had their goal been to gather evidence for the FBI, they could have done a much better job.

Paisana responded that "the fact that they didn't do a great job of violating her rights does not mean they did not violate her rights".

The arguments came during an important phase of Meng's two-year fight to avoid extradition to the US to face fraud charges. The US Justice Department has indicted Meng, Huawei's chief financial officer, on charges that she lied to HSBC about Huawei's business dealings in Iran, thus putting the bank at risk of breaching US sanctions on Tehran.

Meng Wanzhou leaves her home in Vancouver on Thursday. Photo: AP alt=Meng Wanzhou leaves her home in Vancouver on Thursday. Photo: AP

The US wants Meng to face trial in New York. She denies the charges.

Her lawyers are calling for Meng - a daughter of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei - to be released because of the alleged abuses of process. They also say that the US has no jurisdiction over Meng's activities at the heart of the case, which took place during a 2013 presentation in Hong Kong.

On Wednesday, Paisana said that Canadian officers showed a "flagrant disregard" for Meng's rights, then staged a cover-up to obscure their behaviour.

This phase of hearings will continue to April 1, as the extradition battle nears its end game. A final stage of arguments and a committal hearing are scheduled for April 26 to May 14, after which Holmes will decide whether to free Meng or approve her being sent to the US for trial.

But the final decision on whether to extradite her will be up to Canada's justice minister, and appeals could drag out the process for years.

Meng's treatment has roiled China's relations with Canada and the US, with Beijing repeatedly calling for her release. Two Canadians, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, were detained in China in the days following Meng's arrest; they are accused of espionage and will go on trial on Friday and Monday respectively.

Canada considers their arrests retaliatory and that both men are victims of arbitrary detention.

This article originally appeared in the South China Morning Post (SCMP), the most authoritative voice reporting on China and Asia for more than a century. For more SCMP stories, please explore the SCMP app or visit the SCMP's Facebook and Twitter pages. Copyright © 2021 South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

Copyright (c) 2021. South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.