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No coronavirus screening yet for New Yorkers traveling to Palm Beach airport

Evie Fordham

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Travelers arriving at some international airports in Florida, including Palm Beach International Airport (PBI) near President Trump's resort Mar-a-Lago, are not encountering coronavirus screening that is now required at five of the state's major airports, The Palm Beach Post reported.

The screenings involve questionnaires on "key information related to the traveler's history including contact information and trip details" and are being conducted with help from the Florida National Guard.

CORONAVIRUS PUSHES HAWAII, ALASKA TO MANDATE 14-DAY QUARANTINE FOR VISITORS

Flights from the virus-stricken New York tri-state area are still arriving at PBI, according to FlightAware. Florida instituted a quarantine mandate on people coming from virus hotspots like New York and neighboring Connecticut and New Jersey. The governor's executive order cited an influx of visitors escaping areas where shelter in place has been instituted.

Passengers coming from high-risk areas arriving at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL), Miami International Airport (MIA), Orlando International Airport (MCO), Jacksonville International Airport (JAX) and Tampa International Airport (TPA) will face increased screening.

PBI and other international airports in Florida aren't getting the state National Guard assistance on the screening yet.

"We are ready for whatever it is we are required to do in terms of space but we are standing by," PBI spokeswoman Lacy Larson told The Palm Beach Post. "This is not an airport directive."

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Florida will fine any newly arrived person who breaks quarantine up to $500.

Hawaii and Alaska will also begin forcing all out-of-state air travelers to self-isolate for 14 days this week out of concerns over the spread of coronavirus. Hawaii reserves the right to punish individuals with fines of up to $5,000, while Alaska's goes up to $25,000 or a year in prison.

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FOX Business' inquiry to PBI was not immediately returned.

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