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Nvidia is slipping after beating big on earnings and revenue (NVDA)

Jacob Sonenshine
NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang

NVIDIA/Youtube


  • Nvidia beat Wall Street's expectations for the first quarter of 2018 on both revenue and earnings-per-share.
  • Shares are slipping Friday morning in pre-market trading. 
  • The stock hit an all-time high during Thursday's session. 
  • Nvidia shares are far outpacing the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite this year. 
  • Follow Nvidia’s stock price in real-time here

Nvidia reported first-quarter earnings after the closing bell Thursday, and it beat Wall Street's expectations handily. The stock, while initially up in post-market trading Thursday, is slipping about 2% in pre-market trading Friday. 

Nvidia earned an adjusted $2.05 per share, beating analysts' estimate of $1.66 according to Bloomberg. Revenue came in at $3.21 billion, beating the estimate of $2.9 billion. 

Perhaps its most impressive business segment, gaming revenue grew 68% year-over-year. Founder and CEO Jensen Huang made particular note of Nvidia 's gaming revenue. "Our datacenter business achieved another record and gaming remained strong," he said in the company's press release. He added: "We had a strong quarter with growth across every platform." 

Nvidia's stock hit an all-time high of $260.50 a share during normal hours of the trading session, up more than 1% on the day. The stock gained 34% this year through Thursday’s close, far outpacing the Nasdaq Composite’s 7% rally.

Nvidia is not the only stock to be met by a lukewarm share-price reaction even after strong earnings. Most S&P 500 companies have topped earnings forecasts this season, but as of Wednesday, these companies outperformed the market the day after by just 0.5% on average, according to Wells Fargo.   

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