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Oil billionaire schools Elizabeth Warren on energy industry

Julia Limitone

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a vocal critic of nuclear energy, has a lot to learn about oil and gas, according to shale oil pioneer Harold Hamm.

He told FOX Business' Maria Bartiromo on Friday that he invited the 2020 Democratic candidate to tour industry operations when she visits Oklahoma, the home-base of Hamm's company, Continental Resources, and a state at the heart of American shale fracking.

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Warren, during a debate with rival Democratic contenders hosted by PBS and Politico on Thursday, shunned nuclear energy and vowed to invest more in renewable resources.

“I will not build more nuclear,” Warren said. Instead, she added, she wants to put the “energy literally” behind clean energy by increasing “10-fold what we put into science” and research and development.

Warren also slammed politicians in Washington "who keep saying the right thing but continue to take money from the oil industry,” describing the phenomenon as the biggest climate problem the U.S. faces.

In a letter to Warren, Hamm wrote: "Our domestic energy resurgence is making America an energy and economic superpower."

The U.S. is keeping hundreds of billions of dollars out of the hands of "rogue regimes" and "corrupt kleptocracies," and the American renaissance is the "largest energy story since the discovery of oil in the Middle East," he continued.

Hamm told Bartiromo that he has “repeatedly reached out” to Warren, but hasn’t heard back from her.  "She needs to know about oil and gas and what it's done for America, what it's done for the world,” he said. "This has changed the world."

Hamm said Warren is willing to sacrifice millions of jobs and is "going down the path of Hillary Clinton," the New York senator and former secretary of state who lost the 2016 presidential race to Donald Trump.

The U.S. is now producing and exporting more of its own gas around the world. "We've promised energy independence by 2020 and we're there," Hamm said.

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That enables the U.S. and global oil markets to rely less on Saudi Arabia, he pointed out. “They knocked off 5 million barrels a day over there,” Hamm added. “You didn't see a blip on the price of crude oil.”

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