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OPEC: Oil prices to stay below $100 for next decade

Marwan Naamania | AFP | Getty Images. The likelihood of leading oil producers coming to an agreement over a possible output cut or freeze this month looks bleak, according to one expert.

Oil prices will remain below the psychologically important $100-a-barrel mark until at least 2025, according to a draft report by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), seen by The Wall Street Journal.


In its most optimistic scenario, OPEC, which represents 12 oil-producing countries, forecast that oil will sell for around $76 per barrel in 10 years' time, according to the report.

However, it warned that crude oil could cost as little as $40 per barrel in 2025.

"$100 is not in any of the scenarios," said a delegate at an OPEC presentation last week in Vienna, according to The Wall Street Journal.

OPEC has refused to cut its output following a 60 percent crash in oil prices that began in June last year. Brent (Intercontinental Exchange Europe: @LCO.1) and WTI (New York Mercantile Exchange: @CL.1) crude prices have partially recovered from the lows seen at the start of 2015 to trade at around $65 and $59 per barrel respectively.

The draft report seen by the newspaper recommended that OPEC reintroduce the quota system it largely abandoned in 2011, which limited how much oil each member country could produce.

Read MoreClick here to read the full story.



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