U.S. Markets closed

P. H. Glatfelter (NYSE:GLT) Seems To Use Debt Quite Sensibly

Simply Wall St

The external fund manager backed by Berkshire Hathaway's Charlie Munger, Li Lu, makes no bones about it when he says 'The biggest investment risk is not the volatility of prices, but whether you will suffer a permanent loss of capital.' So it seems the smart money knows that debt - which is usually involved in bankruptcies - is a very important factor, when you assess how risky a company is. We note that P. H. Glatfelter Company (NYSE:GLT) does have debt on its balance sheet. But the real question is whether this debt is making the company risky.

What Risk Does Debt Bring?

Debt and other liabilities become risky for a business when it cannot easily fulfill those obligations, either with free cash flow or by raising capital at an attractive price. Part and parcel of capitalism is the process of 'creative destruction' where failed businesses are mercilessly liquidated by their bankers. However, a more usual (but still expensive) situation is where a company must dilute shareholders at a cheap share price simply to get debt under control. Of course, the upside of debt is that it often represents cheap capital, especially when it replaces dilution in a company with the ability to reinvest at high rates of return. When we examine debt levels, we first consider both cash and debt levels, together.

Check out our latest analysis for P. H. Glatfelter

What Is P. H. Glatfelter's Debt?

You can click the graphic below for the historical numbers, but it shows that P. H. Glatfelter had US$390.4m of debt in March 2019, down from US$505.7m, one year before. On the flip side, it has US$76.7m in cash leading to net debt of about US$313.8m.

NYSE:GLT Historical Debt, July 26th 2019

How Strong Is P. H. Glatfelter's Balance Sheet?

The latest balance sheet data shows that P. H. Glatfelter had liabilities of US$221.6m due within a year, and liabilities of US$540.0m falling due after that. Offsetting these obligations, it had cash of US$76.7m as well as receivables valued at US$129.2m due within 12 months. So its liabilities outweigh the sum of its cash and (near-term) receivables by US$555.8m.

This is a mountain of leverage relative to its market capitalization of US$740.6m. Should its lenders demand that it shore up the balance sheet, shareholders would likely face severe dilution.

In order to size up a company's debt relative to its earnings, we calculate its net debt divided by its earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) and its earnings before interest and tax (EBIT) divided by its interest expense (its interest cover). This way, we consider both the absolute quantum of the debt, as well as the interest rates paid on it.

While P. H. Glatfelter's debt to EBITDA ratio (3.6) suggests that it uses debt fairly modestly, its interest cover is very weak, at 2.4. It seems that the business incurs large depreciation and amortisation charges, so maybe its debt load is heavier than it would first appear, since EBITDA is arguably a generous measure of earnings. It seems clear that the cost of borrowing money is negatively impacting returns for shareholders, of late. Looking on the bright side, P. H. Glatfelter boosted its EBIT by a silky 62% in the last year. Like a mother's loving embrace of a newborn that sort of growth builds resilience, putting the company in a stronger position to manage its debt. The balance sheet is clearly the area to focus on when you are analysing debt. But it is future earnings, more than anything, that will determine P. H. Glatfelter's ability to maintain a healthy balance sheet going forward. So if you're focused on the future you can check out this free report showing analyst profit forecasts.

But our final consideration is also important, because a company cannot pay debt with paper profits; it needs cold hard cash. So we always check how much of that EBIT is translated into free cash flow. Over the last three years, P. H. Glatfelter actually produced more free cash flow than EBIT. That sort of strong cash conversion gets us as excited as the crowd when the beat drops at a Daft Punk concert.

Our View

P. H. Glatfelter's conversion of EBIT to free cash flow was a real positive on this analysis, as was its EBIT growth rate. But truth be told its interest cover had us nibbling our nails. When we consider all the elements mentioned above, it seems to us that P. H. Glatfelter is managing its debt quite well. But a word of caution: we think debt levels are high enough to justify ongoing monitoring. We'd be motivated to research the stock further if we found out that P. H. Glatfelter insiders have bought shares recently. If you would too, then you're in luck, since today we're sharing our list of reported insider transactions for free.

At the end of the day, it's often better to focus on companies that are free from net debt. You can access our special list of such companies (all with a track record of profit growth). It's free.

We aim to bring you long-term focused research analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material.

If you spot an error that warrants correction, please contact the editor at editorial-team@simplywallst.com. This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. Simply Wall St has no position in the stocks mentioned. Thank you for reading.