U.S. Markets open in 2 hrs 7 mins

Pennsylvania Attorney Jeffrey H. Penneys Says the Proposed Amendments to 'Dog Law' Would Provide Additional Protections for Dog Attack Victims

PHILADELPHIA, Aug. 13, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Philadelphia's "The Dog Bite Lawyer," Jeffrey H. Penneys, applauds pending legislation in the Pennsylvania Senate, which would expand protections for dog attack victims. On July 9, 2019, Pennsylvania State Senator Tom Killion introduced an important bill which, if passed, will provide critical legal protections for individuals who are injured in dog attacks. Senate Bill 798 proposes to amend Pennsylvania's existing "Dog Law" to remove the requirement that an attack victim prove that the attacking dog had a "propensity to attack human beings" in order to recover just compensation. 

Penneys ⎯ an attorney who focuses on representing dog attack victims in Pennsylvania ⎯ explains, "The Commonwealth's current law requiring proof of an attacking dog's dangerous propensities has long been a difficult and, in some cases, insurmountable hurdle for innocent victims seeking to be fairly compensated after an attack. If Senate Bill 798 is passed, it would be a huge victory for dog attack victims throughout the Commonwealth, and it would also put Pennsylvania in line with many other states where this hurdle is absent."

Pennsylvania's current Dog Law prevents many attack victims from recovering full financial compensation for their losses, which can be substantial. Under the current law, even if an attack is unprovoked, the dog's owner is not liable unless the dog has previously demonstrated a dangerous propensity. Vicious dog attacks often result in severe soft tissue injuries, broken bones, and other traumatic injuries requiring expensive treatment – not to mention the scarring, physical pain and limitations, and emotional trauma that can truly last a lifetime.

While several other states have adopted laws that provide a right to financial compensation for all dog attack victims, Pennsylvania's current law is more akin to the "one free bite" rule that exists in other jurisdictions. Until a dog demonstrates a propensity to attack human beings (by being involved in at least one prior attack, for example), the dog's owner is not responsible if the dog harms another human being.

Mr. Penneys is a strong advocate of the bill. "I hope the legislature is persuaded that this is a fair bill, so the citizens of this Commonwealth can be protected by the law, as opposed to having the law stand in the way of fair compensation." Having represented numerous dog attack victims throughout Pennsylvania, Mr. Penneys has seen first-hand the devastating consequences that unprovoked dog attacks can have for victims and their families. While medical bills can easily run into the tens of thousands of dollars, these out-of-pocket costs often constitute just a small fraction of victims' losses. Loss of income, pain and suffering, post-traumatic stress, and other forms of harm can all potentially be recovered as well, and the passage of Senate Bill 798 will remove a significant roadblock for dog attack victims who deserve to be fully compensated.

About Law Offices of Jeffrey H. Penneys, P.C.

The Law Offices of Jeffrey H. Penneys, P.C., is the only Pennsylvania law firm that specializes in dog bite cases. Mr. Penneys has been representing dog attack victims since 1995 and has recovered millions of dollars in compensation for dog attack victims and their families. Mr. Penneys can be reached on his cell at 215-771-0430, at his office 215-987-3550, toll-free at 1-800-465-8795, or online at www.thedogbitelawfirm.com.

CONTACT:
Jeffrey H. Penneys
Law Offices of Jeffrey H. Penneys, P.C.
230 S Broad St #904
Philadelphia, PA 19102
215-771-0430
www.thedogbitelawfirm.com

Related Images

law-offices-of-jeffrey-h-penneys-p.png
Law Offices of Jeffrey H. Penneys, P.C.

Related Links

Facebook

Twitter

Cision

View original content to download multimedia:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pennsylvania-attorney-jeffrey-h-penneys-says-the-proposed-amendments-to-dog-law-would-provide-additional-protections-for-dog-attack-victims-300900890.html