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Policy notifications and current status, by state

The Associated Press

Millions of Americans who buy their own health insurance were informed this fall that their policies would no longer be offered starting in 2014 because they do not meet the higher standards of the federal Affordable Care Act. The actual number of people receiving the notices is unclear, in part because officials in nearly 20 states say they do not have the information or are not tracking it.

Some states tracked the policy notifications through their insurance departments or health care exchanges. In other states, the largest private insurers released the number of discontinuation notices they issued.

President Barack Obama then said insurance companies could allow the older policies to continue, but left that decision to the states and individual insurers. The response has been mixed.

This chart shows that at least 4.7 million Americans received the cancellation notices. It also provides details about what decision has been made in each state since Obama's announcement (some states had previously decided to allow insurers to continue older policies for a limited time).

It reflects reporting by AP staffers in every state and the District of Columbia and does not include policy cancelations in the small-business insurance market.

State

Number of policies scheduled to be canceled

Current status of those policies

Alabama

90,000

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama, by the far the largest insurer in the state, decided not to extend the canceled policies.

Alaska

5,400

The state gave insurers the option of renewing policies. Premera Blue Cross Blue Shield, the state's largest insurer, and Moda Health, said they would do so.

Arizona

State not tracking

The state did not allow insurers to extend expiring policies.

Arkansans

State not tracking

The state gave insurers the option to extend older policies, and most are doing so.

California

1.1 million

The state did not allow canceled policies to continue.

Colorado

326,590

Most insurers in the state are continuing existing policies for one year.

Connecticut

66,437

Some insurers decided to continue their existing plans for a year while others did not. The state also is offering some consumers the option to buy catastrophic coverage.

Delaware

12,000

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies.

District of Columbia

21,300

The district's insurance department did not allow insurers to extend expiring policies.

Florida

333,000

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies, and Florida Blue and Blue Cross

Blue Shield said they would do so.

Georgia

400,000

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies.

Hawaii

State not tracking

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies. The state's largest insurers, Kaiser Permanente and Hawaii Medical Service Association, agreed to do so. Yet both have asked the state for permission to raise premiums on those plans 8 to 10 percent.

Idaho

105,000

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies. The state's two largest insurers, Blue Cross of Idaho and Regence Blue Shield, said those older policies will continue for one year.

Illinois

185,340

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies through 2014. The largest insurer, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois, is doing so.

Indiana

108,000

The state did not allow insurers to continue canceled policies, but the insurance commissioner and insurers earlier in the year allowed an early renewal option that keeps some older policies in place through 2014.

Iowa

1,000

The state allowed insurers to continue their existing policies through 2014. The state's largest insurer, Wellmark Blue Cross & Blue Shield, said it would do so.

Kansas

State not tracking

The state has allowed the largest insurer, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas to extend 10,000 older policies through 2014.

Kentucky

130,000

The state gave insurers the option of continuing their old policies. Some did and some did not.

Louisiana

92,790

The state allowed insurers to continue their existing policies if they choose.

Maine

Existing plans automatically switched

The state is allowing insurers to continue their existing plans through 2014.

Maryland

73,200

The state allowed insurers to continue their existing polices. CareFirst Blue Cross Blue Shield, the state's largest insurer, opted to do so.

Massachusetts

State not tracking

The state did not allow canceled policies to continue, but also expects that most, if not all, policies sold in the state already meet the higher standards of the federal health care law because Massachusetts passed health insurance reforms in 2006.

Michigan

225,000

The state allowed insurers to continue canceled policies. But the state's largest insurer, Blue Cross Blue Shield, is letting all but one of its old individual plans to lapse. That plan has about 47,000 policyholders.

Minnesota

140,000

The state did not allow canceled policies to continue.

Mississippi

500

The state had already allowed insurers to continue older policies through 2014.

Missouri

State not tracking

The state allowed insurers to continue canceled policies.

Montana

State not tracking

The state insurance commissioner recommended against renewing the canceled policies, and the state's largest insurers said they will not be continued.

Nebraska

State not tracking

The state allowed insurers to continue the existing policies for another year. So far, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Nebraska and United Security Insurance of Omaha have said they will do so.

Nevada

24,600

The state did not allow canceled policies to continue.

New Hampshire

22,000

The state allowed insurers to continue their older policies, and insurance companies have said they will raise premiums on them by an average of 7 percent.

New Jersey

150,000

The state gave insurers the option of continuing their old policies. The largest, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield, indicated it would not continue its basic plan.

New Mexico

26,000

The state decided to allow the continuation of older policies through 2014 even before the Obama administration encouraged it. One insurer that provides coverage to nearly 3,000 people opted against an extension.

New York

100,000

The state did not allow canceled policies to continue.

North Carolina

183,800

The state allowed insurers to continue their old policies, but only Blue Cross chose to do so.

North Dakota

46,550

The state allowed insurers to continue their old policies, but the largest insurer, Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota, opted against doing so.

Ohio

State not tracking

The state gave insurers the option of continuing their old policies; six have said they will do so.

Oklahoma

State not tracking

The state has allowed insurers to continue existing policies through 2014 and most are doing so.

Oregon

135,000

The state allowed insurers to extend canceled policies, and all nine are doing do so. But two of those are extending them only through March 31.

Pennsylvania

250,000

The state allowed old policies to continue. The state's four nonprofit Blue Cross Blue Shield insurers said they would extend those policies for up to six months but also were likely to increase the premiums.

Rhode Island

Existing plans automatically switched

The state did not allow insurers to continue canceled policies.

South Carolina

State not tracking

The state gave insurers the option of continuing their old policies for a year. Some did and some did not.

South Dakota

State not tracking

Insurers were allowed to extend canceled policies. The state's three main health insurers said they would give customers the option of keeping their current plan.

Tennessee

60,000

Insurers were allowed to extend canceled policies.

Texas

State not tracking

The state chose not to get involved, leaving the decision about whether to extend canceled policies to individual insurers.

Utah

State not tracking

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies.

Vermont

Not available

The state had already allowed insurers to extend older policies through March 31, 2014, but will not allow them to continue beyond that.

Virginia

State not tracking

The state did not allow insurers to continue their older policies.

Washington

290,000

The state did not allow insurers to continue their older policies.

West Virginia

State not tracking

The state did not allow insurers to continue their older policies.

Wisconsin

State not tracking

The state allowed insurers to continue existing policies.

Wyoming

3,200

Insurance companies were given the option to renew, and the state insurance commissioner says most of the older plans will be extended for 2014.