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Some Of The Presidential Candidates Released Their Tax Returns — & They’re In The 1%

Ludmila Leiva

The race toward the 2020 election is heating up. Over the past few months, several presidential hopefuls have announced their candidacy, in the process igniting discussions and national debates as to who is most fit to lead the country forward.

Ongoing outrage regarding Donald Trump’s refusal to share his tax returns with the American people has placed the topic of income and taxation at the forefront of many voters’ minds. Particularly, many Americans have voiced concerns around the fact that politicians tend to be out of touch with the needs and struggles of the average American. And as we get closer to the next presidential election, tax returns have once again become a hot topic.

This month, a handful of Democratic candidates released their federal tax returns in hopes of setting themselves apart from President Trump. But despite platforms that promise to fight for things like income equality — curbing the unfair advantages of the 1% and empowering the 99% — some of the candidates are part of the 1% themselves. In fact, of the seven candidates who released their returns, at least three are millionaires: Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren. And all of the candidates who have shared their financial information so far have been making upwards of $200,000 a year, filing jointly with their spouses.

In other words, these candidates are earning a lot more than their fellow Americans (the average American family brings in $60,000 a year). Ahead, we take a look at some of the key information found in this new financial data from some of the democratic candidates who have chosen to disclose their earnings.

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders

Adjusted gross income (2018): $561,293

Taxes paid: $145,840

Amount given to charity: $18,950 (3.3% of household income)

Tax rate: 26%

Photo: Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images.

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren

Adjusted gross income (2018): $846,394

Taxes paid: $230,965

Tax rate: 27%

Amount given to charity: $50,128 (6% of household income)

Photo: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images.

Washington State Governor Jay Inslee

Adjusted gross income (2018): $202,912

Taxes paid: $29,906

Tax Rate: 15%

Amount given to charity: $8,300 (4% of household income)

Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images.

California Senator Kamala Harris

Adjusted gross income (2018): $1,889,156

Taxes paid: $697,611

Tax rate: 36.9%

Amount given to charity: $27,000 (1.4% of household income)

Photo: Randy Holmes/Getty Images.

New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand

Adjusted gross income (2018): $214,083

Taxes paid: $29,170

Tax rate: 14%

Amount given to charity: $3,750 (2% of household income)

Photo: Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/Shutterstock.

Former Texas Representative Beto O'Rourke

Adjusted gross income (2017): $366,455

Total tax paid: $81,019

Tax rate: 22%

Amount given to charity: $1,166 (0.3% of household income)

Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images.

Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar

Adjusted gross income (2018): $338,121

Taxes paid: $65,927

Tax rate: 19%

Amount given to charity: $6,600 (2% of household income)

Photo: Paula Lobo/ABC/Getty Images.

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