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New rules for schools

·3 min read

Good morning, study buddies.

Today’s issue of Study Hall is abbreviated given that we – and many of you – have the day off for the Fourth of July. Hope you’re enjoying time with loved ones and your favorite summertime foods.

It's July and that means many of the laws that lawmakers approved back in the spring are now effective, including the ones that impact schools.

Of those, the one that's most in the spotlight is the ban on transgender girls playing girls' sports in K-12 schools, which as you know, is already being challenged in court.

The ACLU sued Indianapolis Public Schools on behalf of a 10-year-old transgender girl who won’t be able to keep playing on her all-girls’ softball team at her school. The girl's lawyers argued that the ban violates the girl’s rights under Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and violates Title IX.

Since the lawsuit was filed, AG Todd Rokita's office got involved and, unsurprisingly, argued the opposite.

The girl's lawyers asked for a preliminary injunction which would essentially stop the ban until the court made a decision. The AG's office was against the idea, and IPS said it had no position on the matter.

But IPS did add this: The new law would prevent the girl from playing softball and that "is inconsistent with IPS’ obligation under Title IX, and that re-designating girls’ sports as co-ed sports would likely run afoul of Title IX as well.”

But without the injunction, the law went into effect on Friday.

The case is ongoing, and IPS softball season starts mid-August. We'll be watching to let you know how it all unfolds.

Here's more on the new laws impacting schools.

Syllabus

Need to catch up on education news from last week? Here’s your required reading:

In K-12 news:

In higher education news:

Until next week,

— Arika, MJ & Caroline

What do you want to learn more about in the next Study Hall? Email suggestions, feedback and tips to education@indystar.com.

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This article originally appeared on Indianapolis Star: New rules for schools