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Rob Lowe defends Prince William bald comments, calls the royal a 'stud'

Francesca Specter
Yahoo Style UK deputy editor

Rob Lowe has defended his controversial comments about Prince William’s hair loss.

The 55-year-old was accused of “overstepping the mark” for speaking about the Duke of Cambridge’s baldness last week.

He claimed it was “traumatic” watching the prince lose his hair, after saying “British men set a low bar” for vanity, during an interview with The Telegraph.

Now, the American actor has apologised for the comments – saying they’re a sign of his own “insecurity”.

Rob Lowe has defended his comments about the Duke of Cambridge. [Photo: Getty/ITV]

READ MORE: How to slow hair loss

“That says more about me than him,” he said, in an interview on ITV’s ‘Good Morning Britain’ this morning.

“My point was here’s a guy who is fully comfortable in his own skin, then on the other side of the coin you have me, I can’t even watch another guy go bald without being even more narcissistic and wanting to plug in the propecia into a drip into my own [vein].

He added: “This is my thing, I saw the hubbub it caused on your side of the pond, I think it’s a case of two countries divided by a common language.”

Lowe concluded by praising the royal, calling him a “stud”.

“Because that was literally me slagging my own insecurity and narcissism. He’s a stud, I love him. He’s awesome,” he said.

READ MORE: Has a cure for baldness been discovered?

Male pattern baldness affects around one in two of men by the age of fifty and usually beginning around the late twenties and early thirties, according to the NHS.

For many, like Prince William and more recently his brother Prince Harry, it is down to hereditary genes.

There are a number of methods to help slow the process of hair loss, from taking supplements, and well as more permanent solutions such as hair transplants.

There are also specific anti- hair loss medications available. However, one on the market, finasteride, has recently been linked for dwindling male fertility rates.