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Russia has lost over 1,000 tanks in Ukraine, says Pentagon

Equipment of the occupiers in Ukraine
Equipment of the occupiers in Ukraine

Read also: NATO states informally agree not to supply fighters, tanks to Ukraine — Die Zeit

At the same time, the United States warn that Moscow still has “majority” of its military capacity intact.

“They have invested an awful lot of their hardware and their personnel in this fight, and the Ukrainians have suffered losses, the Russians have suffered losses,” said an unnamed official.

Read also: Russian ‘security elite’ understands that the war is lost, Bellingcat says

He added that Russia maintains an advantage in manpower and military equipment in Ukraine.

“Russians do have a superiority here in terms of number of assets they can apply to this fight in terms of people, and equipment and weapons, and we just have to bear that in mind.”

Read also: The New York Times unveils new evidence of Russian war crimes in Bucha

Ukraine has been asking its partners for assistance in combating Russian aggression from the very start of the war, particularly for heavy weaponry and aviation assets. The U.S. has been one of the largest contributors to Ukraine’s defense in this regards, supplying Ukraine with anti-tank systems, howitzers, and a variety of other equipment.

On May 9, U.S. President Joe Biden signed a lend-lease program for Ukraine into law, allowing Ukraine to request a far greater range of weaponry, including heavy weaponry, from the United States.

On May 21, Biden signed a $40 billion aid bill for Ukraine into law, $20 billion of which is marked for military assistance.