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Russian troops massing military equipment from near and far to Ukraine’s borders, says CIT

Analysts noticed the movement of military equipment throughout the territory of Russia
Analysts noticed the movement of military equipment throughout the territory of Russia

According to him, the deployment of equipment after the announcement of mobilization indicates that it was not prepared in advance.

Read also: Belarus kicks off military drills on ‘liberation of occupied territories’

Mikhailov noted that if the Kremlin wants to mobilize a million people, they will definitely not have enough weapons at the mobilization depots. Additionally, if this equipment is quickly de-mothballed and pulled out of storage, its quality and reliability will be questionable.

Read also: Belarus preparing to accommodate 20,000 new conscripts from Russia, says intelligence

He added that at the current intensity of the fighting, Russia's tank stocks should suffice for several more years of war.

"But these calculations were made before large-scale offensives, first of all in the area of Izyum where rather modern tanks were destroyed or damaged," Mikhailov stated.

“Russia has nothing to replace them with. Russia can get some T-72s from storage and repair them. But to modernize such a tank – to install a thermal imager, a fire control system, a normal commander's observation station – there is not enough capacity and there will not be enough (in the future). They will have to look for alternative supply channels. And this, of course, will be problematic for Russia.”

Read also: Lukashenko denies rumors of mobilization in Belarus

Russian dictator Vladimir Putin announced a "partial mobilization" in Russia on Sept. 21. The call-up came after the Russian army suffered a heavy defeat in Ukraine, losing swathes of formerly occupied territory in Ukraine’s Kharkiv Oblast.

According to official data from the Russian Defense Ministry, the plan is to draft about 300,000 reservists. However, the part of the published decree ordering the mobilization dealing with the number of draftees is marked only “for official use.”

According to Russian opposition media, the secret paragraph of the plan details the mobilization of around one million Russians for the war in Ukraine.

Read the original article on The New Voice of Ukraine