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Samsung's 'history of electronics' animated videos seem like great sleep aids

·Contributing Writer
·1 min read

Samsung wants to teach you about the history of electronics, as long as you can stay awake long enough to sit through the dull lessons. Through its Innovation Museum, the company is releasing five animated videos about inventions that shaped society. If the first episode is anything to go by, they might as well be classified as sleep aids.

The series premiere delves into the history of telecommunications, starting with Morse code and how it paved the way for more recent innovations such as smartphones, 3G, 4G and (would you believe it?) 5G. The tone and narration is Atacama Desert dry, though. Even the name of the series is melatonin-inducing: "The History of the Electronics Industry That Changed the World."

There's no denying the importance of Morse code, including how it's helped save the lives of many who were able to send an SOS message when they were in peril. But Samsung could have presented the story in a much more interesting way. For what it's worth, the episode is educational. But, if you're going to create a video in which "some aspects have been fictionalized," at least make it fun. 

Upcoming installments will cover John Logie Baird's TV, telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell, James Harrison's refrigerator and William Shockley and the semiconductor. Perhaps those will be more compelling, but it's hard to imagine anyone excitedly dashing off a telegram to a friend about it.