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The Scary Way a Stealth Fighter Could Be Shot Down

War Is Boring
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northrop_Grumman_B-2_Spirit#/media/File:US_Air_Force_B-2_Spirit.jpg

War Is Boring

Security, Asia

Not impossible.

The Scary Way a Stealth Fighter Could Be Shot Down

There is a famous series of videos showing experimentation with "selective attention.”  Selective attention suggests we focus on certain elements in our environment while other elements disappear into the background. This is the case with the stealth bomber; it disappears into the background of other, higher levels of electronic stimulus. Simply put, the phenomenon of selective attention demonstrates the power of a stealth bomber to delay detection in the current strategic environment.

The entire kill chain for bringing down an invading aircraft is not as easy as the horrific shoot down of flight MH-17 might suggest.

Seventy years ago today, Col. Paul Tibbets flew the Enola Gay on a mission that would change the course of world history and set the stage for the development of nuclear deterrence. The mission itself was straightforward, but the enormous scientific and industrial activity leading up to it was not. The atomic weapon, "Little Boy,” involved a massive industrial effort that is only slightly less difficult today. The development of the B-29 bomber that delivered the bomb was no simple matter either. It required an aircraft that flew higher and faster than any other aircraft could at the time.

(This article originally appeared in 2015.)

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