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The science behind why people turn to gardening to cope with stress

Jaime Calder and her daughters plant some squash in her vegetable garden in Round Rock, Texas, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spread in the U.S., April 7, 2020. Picture taken April 7, 2020. REUTERS/Sergio Flores
Jaime Calder and her daughters plant some squash in her vegetable garden in Round Rock, Texas, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) spread in the U.S., April 7, 2020. Picture taken April 7, 2020. REUTERS/Sergio Flores

In his 2019 essay on The Healing Power of Gardens, the late neurologist Oliver Sacks tried to grasp the mysterious curative effects of nature on the human body. “I cannot say exactly how nature exerts its calming and organizing effects on our brains,” Sacks writes, “but I have seen in my patients the restorative and…

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