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Sean McDonough's voice cracking had everyone cracking up

Sean McDonough is one of ESPN’s finest broadcasting talents. He has called an assortment of different sports and marquee games across the worldwide leader, most notably for “Monday Night Football.” And yet, alongside color man Jon Gruden for the final time during the Kansas City Chiefs vs. Tennessee Titans wild-card game, McDonough had an especially hard time saying goodbye to the newly minted Oakland Raiders head coach.

Coach as we wrap this one up, all of us last night in our production meeting had a chance to tell you what we think about you, and how much you’ve meant to us and to Monday Night Football, and what a great way to send you off. Appropriately so. Good luck with the Oakland Raiders. It’ll be tough for a lot of us on the crew to be impartial when we go into those production meetings and see you next year.

It was an honest final moment for one of the more entertaining broadcasting tandems.

Additionally, McDonough’s voice broke down just prior to that moment, when the Chiefs thought they had a fumble return for a touchdown to potentially win the game. Upon further review, the officials made the correct provision, ruling that Titans running back Derrick Henry was down by contact before coughing up the football.


Tennessee went on to win the game, 22-21, completing an impressive comeback and extending an NFL record sixth straight playoff home loss for the Chiefs.

Sean McDonough was effusive in his praise of Jon Gruden, whom he says will be missed greatly as Gruden departs to coach the Oakland Raiders. (Screengrab)

 

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Jordan Schultz is an NFL, NBA and NCAAB insider/analyst for Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at Jordan.Schultz@Oath.com.

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