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Shionogi Announces Strategic Re-Organization of U.S. Executive Leadership

·9 min read

FLORHAM PARK, N.J., June 01, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Shionogi Inc., the United States subsidiary of Shionogi & Co., Ltd. based in New Jersey, has announced a strategic executive leadership re-organization and expansion of the company’s Executive Committee with the following changes effective July 1, 2022:

  • Nate McCutcheon, currently Shionogi Inc.’s Chief Operating Officer, will be promoted to assume the role of President and Chief Executive Officer of Shionogi Inc.

  • Tadashi Hara, currently Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, will take on the newly created role of Executive Vice President and Chief Global Operations Officer.

  • Joseph Spagnardi will continue his role as Executive Vice President, Legal and Compliance.

  • Gianine Esposito will be promoted to Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer.

  • Margaret Borys has recently joined the organization as Senior Vice President and Chief Commercial Officer.

  • Masahiro Fujita will join Shionogi Inc. as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

"As I return to Japan to lead Shionogi Pharma Co., Ltd, it was clear Nate McCutcheon was the right choice to take over the company’s helm given his professional experience and leadership abilities," said Akira Kato, outgoing Shionogi Inc. President and CEO. "Both myself and the leadership in Japan have great confidence in his ability to advance Shionogi’s vision here in the U.S."

"During my tenure with Akira we have helped Shionogi Inc. deliver a highly successful launch of Fetroja® (cefiderocol) and improved our financial position and efficiency significantly. I am very proud of what we have accomplished together," said McCutcheon, newly-appointed President and CEO of Shionogi Inc. "I intend to maintain our current trajectory of success, but our efforts must now also turn to the tremendous opportunities we have in the future in terms of both organic and inorganic growth opportunities."

"Today’s announcement of our newly formed executive team is an important step on our journey to make the U.S. business become an instrumental player within the network of Shionogi Group Companies. Since the release of the STS2030 medium-term business plan, we have taken significant strides to transform our organization so that we may bring the best possible medicines to the patients we serve. As the new President and CEO of Shionogi’s U.S. group company, I have full confidence that with the right team and the support from headquarters in Japan we can develop, acquire and commercialize a portfolio of products to transform our U.S. business." McCutcheon said in closing.

About Shionogi

Shionogi & Co., Ltd. is a leading global research-driven pharmaceutical company based in Japan, dedicated to bringing benefits to patients based on its corporate philosophy of "supplying the best possible medicine to protect the health and wellbeing of the patients we serve." The company has discovered and developed novel medicines for HIV, influenza and antimicrobial resistance, and currently markets products in several therapeutic areas including anti-infectives with the first siderophore cephalosporin., FETROJA® (cefiderocol; known as FETCROJA® in Europe). Shionogi is also dedicated to addressing COVID-19 by pursuing the discovery of novel therapeutics and the development of vaccine and diagnostic products including the 3CL protease inhibitor, S-217622, an investigational oral antiviral therapeutic. Other therapeutic areas and the focus of the company’s pipeline include CNS/psychoneurological diseases, oncology and pain. For more information on Shionogi & Co., Ltd., visit https://www.shionogi.com/global/en/. Shionogi Inc. is the U.S. subsidiary of Shionogi & Co., Ltd. based in N.J. For more information on Shionogi Inc., please visit https://www.shionogi.com. Shionogi B.V. is the European headquarters of Shionogi & Co., Ltd. For more information on Shionogi B.V., please visit www.shionogi.eu.

In the U.S., Shionogi is actively seeking late stage assets that will benefit patients and that lead to healthier lives in the next few years. Please visit www.shionogi.com/us/en/about/partners to learn more about Shionogi, the company’s therapeutic priorities and how to connect.

Forward Looking Statement

This announcement contains forward-looking statements. These statements are based on expectations in light of the information currently available, assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from these statements. Risks and uncertainties include general domestic and international economic conditions such as general industry and market conditions, and changes of interest rate and currency exchange rate. These risks and uncertainties particularly apply with respect to product-related forward-looking statements. Product risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, completion and discontinuation of clinical trials; obtaining regulatory approvals; claims and concerns about product safety and efficacy; technological advances; adverse outcome of important litigation; domestic and foreign healthcare reforms and changes of laws and regulations. Also, for existing products, there are manufacturing and marketing risks, which include, but are not limited to, inability to build production capacity to meet demand, unavailability of raw materials and entry of competitive products. The company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

INDICATIONS
Fetroja® (cefiderocol) is indicated in patients 18 years of age or older for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs), including pyelonephritis caused by the following susceptible Gram-negative microorganisms: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae complex.

Fetroja is indicated in patients 18 years of age or older for the treatment of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia, caused by the following susceptible Gram-negative microorganisms: Acinetobacter baumannii complex, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae complex, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens.

USAGE
To reduce the development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of Fetroja and other antibacterial drugs, Fetroja should be used only to treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by susceptible bacteria.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
CONTRAINDICATIONS
Fetroja is contraindicated in patients with a known history of severe hypersensitivity to cefiderocol or other beta-lactam antibacterial drugs, or any other component of Fetroja.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
Increase in All-Cause Mortality in Patients with Carbapenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
An increase in all-cause mortality was observed in patients treated with Fetroja as compared to best available therapy (BAT) in a multinational, randomized, open-label trial in critically ill patients with carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections (NCT02714595). Patients with nosocomial pneumonia, bloodstream infections, sepsis, or cUTI were included in the trial. BAT regimens varied according to local practices and consisted of 1 to 3 antibacterial drugs with activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the BAT regimens contained colistin.

The increase in all-cause mortality occurred in patients treated for nosocomial pneumonia, bloodstream infections, or sepsis. The 28-Day all-cause mortality was higher in patients treated with Fetroja than in patients treated with BAT [25/101 (24.8%) vs 9/49 (18.4%), treatment difference 6.4%, 95% CI (-8.6, 19.2)]. All-cause mortality remained higher in patients treated with Fetroja than in patients treated with BAT through Day 49 [34/101 (33.7%) vs 10/49 (20.4%), treatment difference 13.3%, 95% CI (-2.5, 26.9)]. Generally, deaths were in patients with infections caused by Gram-negative organisms, including non-fermenters such as Acinetobacter baumannii complex, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and were the result of worsening or complications of infection, or underlying comorbidities. The cause of the increase in mortality has not been established.

Closely monitor the clinical response to therapy in patients with cUTI and HABP/VABP.

Hypersensitivity Reactions

Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactic) reactions and serious skin reactions have been reported in patients receiving beta-lactam antibacterial drugs. Hypersensitivity was observed in Fetroja-treated patients in clinical trials. These reactions are more likely to occur in individuals with a history of beta-lactam hypersensitivity and/or a history of sensitivity to multiple allergens. There have been reports of individuals with a history of penicillin hypersensitivity who have experienced severe reactions when treated with cephalosporins.

Before therapy with Fetroja is instituted, inquire about previous hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins, penicillins, or other beta-lactam antibacterial drugs. Discontinue Fetroja if an allergic reaction occurs.

Clostridioides difficile-associated Diarrhea (CDAD)
Clostridioides difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported for nearly all systemic antibacterial agents, including Fetroja. CDAD may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon and may permit overgrowth of C. difficile.
Careful medical history is necessary because CDAD has been reported to occur more than 2 months after the administration of antibacterial agents.
If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, antibacterial drugs not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued. Manage fluid and electrolyte levels as appropriate, supplement protein intake, monitor antibacterial treatment of C. difficile, and institute surgical evaluation as clinically indicated.

Seizures and Other Central Nervous System (CNS) Adverse Reactions
Cephalosporins, including Fetroja, have been implicated in triggering seizures. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE), encephalopathy, coma, asterixis, neuromuscular excitability, and myoclonia have been reported with cephalosporins particularly in patients with a history of epilepsy and/or when recommended dosages of cephalosporins were exceeded due to renal impairment. Adjust Fetroja dosing based on creatinine clearance. Anticonvulsant therapy should be continued in patients with known seizure disorders. If CNS adverse reactions including seizures occur, patients should undergo a neurological evaluation to determine whether Fetroja should be discontinued.

Development of Drug-Resistant Bacteria
Prescribing Fetroja in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection or a prophylactic indication is unlikely to provide benefit to the patient and increases the risk of the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

ADVERSE REACTIONS
The most common adverse reactions occurring in (≥2%) of patients receiving Fetroja compared to imipenem/cilastatin in the cUTI trial were: diarrhea (4% vs 6%), infusion site reactions (4% vs 5%), constipation (3% vs 4%), rash (3% vs <1%), candidiasis (2% vs 3%), cough (2% vs <1%), elevations in liver tests (2% vs <1%), headache (2% vs 5%), hypokalemia (2% vs 3%), nausea (2% vs 4%), and vomiting (2% vs 1%). The most common adverse reactions occurring in (≥4%) of patients receiving Fetroja compared to meropenem in the HABP/VABP trial were: elevations in liver tests (16% vs 16%), hypokalemia (11% vs 15%), diarrhea (9% vs 9%), hypomagnesemia (5% vs <1%), and atrial fibrillation (5% vs 3%).

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220601006240/en/

Contacts

Shionogi Inc. Media:
Lindsay Bohlander
973-665-4245
Lindsay.bohlander@shionogi.com