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Sony says it’s the beginning of the end for PS4

Rachel England

The PS4 era is over. Speaking to investors, PlayStation boss John Kodera outlined the company's three-year roadmap and it seems the console, which has sold 79 million units since its launch in 2013, is not going to be part of it. This is largely due to declining sales which is, Kodera notes, typical of the usual profit- and life-cycle of consoles. It does also suggest a new console might be on its way -- likely the PS5 -- but Kodera didn't give away any specifics.

However, he did note that the company plans to "crouch down" until March 2021, which might be when we see a new offering, although it's likely he's alluding to an expected slowdown in profits until that time, while the company fortifies itself against the drops in fortune it's seen with other console generations. Its online services are doing well to bridge that gap, though. PS+ grew by 60 percent in the two years leading up to April 2018, and the company plans to capitalize on that by adding new games and creating exclusive game franchises to further boost numbers.

The whole statement is largely designed to reassure investors that all is well, and it is, save for PSVR and Vue, both of which are performing below expectations. Again, no specifics on how PlayStation plans to tackle that beyond "increasing user engagement", but Kodera seems unfazed, noting that the company will aim for more "realistic" growth in the coming period.

The PS4 (RIP) hit the shelves just eight months after it was announced, while the PS3 took 18 months to arrive following its announcement. So how long we'll have to wait for the next PlayStation console is anyone's guess. It's clear, though, that official announcements won't be made for a while -- maybe even a couple of years -- but as long as the company can stick to its current trajectory, it's definitely on its way.

Sony [PDF], Sony webcast

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  • This article originally appeared on Engadget.