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Space Talent puts jobs at Blue Origin, SpaceX and elsewhere in one big database

Alan Boyle
Blue Origin has more than 600 job openings nationwide. (Blue Origin Photo)

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin space venture and Elon Musk’s SpaceX are often at odds, but there’s at least one place where those two space-industry rivals are on the same page: the newly unveiled Space Talent job database.

The search engine for careers in the space industry is a project of Space Angels, a nationwide network designed to link angel investors with space entrepreneurs.

“If you’ve ever considered working in space, this jobs board has 3,000 reasons to make the leap,” Space Angels CEO Chad Anderson said in a tweet.

The database aggregates job postings from Blue Origin and SpaceX as well as smaller space ventures — including Kymeta Corp., Olis Robotics, Spaceflight Industries and Tethers Unlimited in the Seattle area.

If nothing else, the lineup demonstrates how dominant Bezos’ privately held company is when it comes to Washington state’s space industry. As of today, Blue Origin accounted for 602 of the 2,934 jobs listed in the database, and 482 of those openings are in Kent, Wash.

In comparison, SpaceX listed 431 openings nationwide, including 48 associated with its satellite development operation in Redmond, Wash.

Other Washington state ventures were far behind: Spaceflight Industries lists 15 openings, with eight in Seattle (although because of a twist in the search-engine coding, those jobs don’t come up in a Washington state search). Bothell, Wash.-based Tethers Unlimited has six openings, Seattle-based Olis Robotics has two, and Redmond-based Kymeta lists one.

Space Talent takes in 141 companies nationwide, but if you’re looking for a job in the space industry, don’t stop your search there. The database has some notable gaps: You won’t find aerospace giants such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin or Northrop Grumman on the website, for example.

The website also misses some space companies in the Seattle area, ranging from First Mode on the low end of the workforce size spectrum to Aerojet Rocketdyne on the high end. (For what it’s worth, Aerojet has 28 openings at its Redmond facility, while Seattle-based First Mode lists nine roles for job applicants.)

You’ll have to turn to Amazon’s job database to find the 96 openings associated with its Project Kuiper broadband satellite development effort, based in Bellevue, Wash.

Space ventures who want to help fill in the gaps can do so by adding their job listings to the database. There are standards, however: The venture has to have been founded after 2000 (sorry, Aerojet), and it has to have raised at least $100,000 in equity investment.

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