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Statement by the Minister of Public Safety on World Day Against Human Trafficking in Persons

·2 min read

OTTAWA, ON, July 30, 2022 /CNW/ - Today, the Honourable Marco Mendicino, Minister of Public Safety, issued the following statement:

"Human trafficking robs people of their humanity. From sex trafficking to forced labour, traffickers prey on the most vulnerable members of our society. On this World Day Against Trafficking in Persons, we join countries around the world in raising awareness and redoubling our efforts to end this heinous crime.

In Canada, human trafficking almost always involves the sexual exploitation of young women and girls. Indigenous people, immigrants, people with disabilities and LGBTQ2+ individuals are often at greater risk. Around the world, trafficking can take many different forms and it often begins online – a trend exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. That is why this year's World Day Against Trafficking in Persons focuses on the role of technology in enabling human trafficking.

Tragically, human trafficking is a crime that continues to be underreported. Combatting it requires urgent action across all levels of government, in close partnership with industry and civil society. These efforts are supported through the National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking, which brings together federal efforts to address human trafficking at home and abroad under one strategic plan. With over $60 million in federal funding, our focus is to prevent trafficking, prosecute offenders and empower survivors.

Guided by the national strategy, we're taking action across government. This begins with my department's awareness campaign – including both advertisements and an interactive educational experience making stops across Canada. I'm also working with the Minister of Labour on legislation to eradicate forced labour from our supply chains. Finally, Canada will meet with the United States and Mexico this fall to revitalize the Trilateral Working Group on Trafficking in Persons, which strengthens anti-trafficking work across North America. This complements other engagements, like the Working Group on Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls.

Human trafficking is a complex problem, with ties to gender-based violence, the ongoing tragedy of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and many other pressing issues. It is one we must solve. On this World Day Against Trafficking in Persons, we recommit ourselves to protecting victims, fighting traffickers, and preventing this inhuman crime from happening in the first place."

Related links:

SOURCE Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada

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View original content: http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/July2022/30/c9541.html